Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Messages from Tom Cat

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Thanks Ralph for explaining about cats and water. That may be true for dogs also. I remember occasionally seeing my dog paw at her water. It's been so long since I had her that I can't remember that for sure. I miss her.
    Virginia

    Comment


      From Ralph (Tom Cat) today:
      Good morning to all of you out there. We're back into cooler weather again. Around freezing at night, going into the 40's by the afternoons. Some much needed rain & overcast days. Watching all the wildlife here out of the living room window with my first cup of coffee in the morning. Ready to walk over to Marty's with the coffee and some apple fritters in a minute.

      Each day I have 3 deer or so in the back & front of the house, in the morning & evening. That & upwards of 18 turkeys. Some nice large tom turkeys, with long beards & bright red heads. Then in an adjacent field we have a pair of sandhill cranes. They nested here last year & brought up a pair of young ones. Also Canada geese flying over each morning, from the marshes to the farm fields. That makes life here great. One easily forgets that, when doing the upkeep on the land. This is what many city folks spend money taking vacations to, aye?

      SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

      Comment


        From Tom Cat today:



        A sneak shot of 3 of the deer out of the kitchen window 10 minutes ago. If I stand up they take off. There were another 2 deer out the back window. I put a couple of coffee cans of corn, & within 10 minutes they were here. I expect there will be turkeys coming in soon too. Have a good day.
        I'm seeing only two deer but maybe someone will find the third one.
        Last edited by agate; 03-29-2021, 03:32 PM.
        SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

        Comment


          Tom Cat has posted another photo so we can see 3 deer this time. There's a message too--I'll add it later when I have more time.

          SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

          Comment


            Here are the messages--this one goes with the deer photo in the last post:

            Let's try this again. I finally got a photo out back & out the kitchen window that looks half way decent. The deer didn't take off on me. You should see 3 deer or more. There were up to 5 feeding at one time. I put out a little corn, & they came in from 300 ft., in the back field in 10 minutes. Neat seeing them, aye?

            Better get the coffee going. Take care & virtual hugs
            .
            There's also this:

            Just one of the red squirrels on the hand rail, getting an easy sunflower seed meal.

            Got the garden prairie in front cleaned up, to where you can see the soil. More bulb flowers are showing up. Put some screen cages over a few tulip plants I have. The deer eat them off as soon as they emerge. I think I've put in a hundred or so tulip bulbs here. I gave up trying more. For winter plowing & bed cleanup I remove the screens, & forget to get them in place before the deer eat them. They don't seem to bother the crocus or daffodils. There are bulbs coming up around the cat chasing the butterfly. I think I put more bulbs in there last fall. In some of the areas around the house where I renew the grass each year, I'm putting in some Austrian peas for the wildlife. I have a few places near the prairie & over at Joe's place we have feed plots with peas & crimson clover, etc., for the wildlife. These are annual feed plots that won't interfere with the prairie. Always busy.

            I have several days' dishes in the sink & a couple of weeks' wash to fold up. Whatever I do outside, postpone the inside chores. Getting in more than a six-hour day is the best I'm doing.

            We're back in the 30's again, & some teens at night. Not corn or tomato planting season yet. It is bright out, which sure helps raise the spirits. Take care.
            Last edited by agate; 03-31-2021, 05:04 PM.
            SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

            Comment


              From Tom Cat (Wednesday):

              Here is how far Joe is on his shed. Next the roof & the door. I have sheet metal for the roof, which I have to cut. Need some practice with the friction blade on the hand circular saw. Been decades since I've done that. Need to be careful because the saw likes to kick back when you do that.
              SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

              Comment


                Hope Ralph is very careful.
                Virginia

                Comment


                  The star magnolia tree, & a close-up blossom. The flowers will be gone in a week. They're short lived, come out before the leaves, & lose the petals fast in the wind. But beautiful in bloom.

                  SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

                  Comment


                    Message from Tom Cat (today):

                    This star magnolia is only around 22 years old. Marty got it for us when we retired here. It has a 6 feet high & 10 feet or so in diameter fence around it. The deer love it & beat on the fence when it leafs out to eat the leaves. It does make a statement, especially in the early spring, as we wait for everything to start growing.

                    Cool 40's in the morning, low 50's in the afternoon. About normal, or a little warmer than normal. A larger number of our spruce trees, & some pines, 40 feet high, have died off in the last 5 years. Drought on these sandy soils stressed them, followed by fungal infection & boring insects.

                    Many of these trees had been here for over 50 years. We've had a number of straight line winds that have taken down old oaks and newer black locust in recent years. There are enough dead fall trees out there to get 8 to 10 cords of wood out each year. Unfortunately you need some heavy-duty equipment to pull the logs out. The land is up and down 50-foot ridges and valleys. It's enough keeping the fallen trees cut up along the driveways and paths.

                    Marty is doing poorly, having a hard time concentrating on things, and loses track of the days sometimes, plus a poor appetite. His sister from Illinois (a 6-hour trip) has been up for a few days at a time, with one of his sisters-in-law, sorting out papers and other stuff for him. Next week a neighbor and I will be taking him to doctors at 3 different hospitals, from 15 to 60 miles out. Those will be 4-hour stressful days for all of us.

                    Yes, he knows about hospice, but they don't do lawn and garden care, and a lot of things in the country we folks do by ourselves or hopefully some friends. That is the price we come to pay for life in out-of-the-way places. I think most of us who live here knew those choices when we came here. It's nice looking out of the windows and seeing nature in its raw.

                    You and the others take care. Virtual hugs too.
                    SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

                    Comment


                      I am so sorry about Marty. Even closer to the city it doesn't help as far as getting things done at a time like this. I remember this from when my husband was in Marty's condition. We had a beautiful big lawn and all of a sudden I had to look for someone to hire to cut and trim one and a third acre lawn. This doesn't sound like much, but between the Doctor visits, staying in the hospital, taking care of our dog (or getting neighbors to feed her), paying bills, doing the banking and worrying about everything else 1 1/3 acres is a lot to think about.

                      My heart goes out to Ralph as well as Marty. It is a hard time for everyone, and the thought of loosing someone you have known as long as Ralph has known Marty is a hard thing to deal with.
                      Last edited by Virginia; 04-10-2021, 06:22 PM.
                      Virginia

                      Comment


                        Seeing Ralph's picture of the magnolia made me look outside at mine. Nothing to see there yet. And it never made the full show that Ralph's star magnolia does. I guess it's a different kind of magnolia.
                        If Marty wishes to stay on his land, he (or someone on his behalf) might need to check with landscaping companies to see if any would take care of it. Or just let the upkeep go. He could continue watching nature even if it were unruly.

                        Comment


                          From Tom Cat today:

                          Marty keeps his land in a pretty natural state, with half of it in prairie, which he burns every few years. It will take care of itself for years with little maintenance. Keeping the drive plowed in winter is the main upkeep. A small garden in front of flowers & A few vegan beds will do well on their own for a while. He can see out his front & back windows-- deer, turkeys, squirrels, all kinds of song birds, & even a pair of sandhill cranes in an adjacent field.

                          His biggest problem right now is his loss of appetite. He's doing an egg & toast for breakfast, but really little after that. He has an appointment at 3 different hospitals the next 3 days. A neighbor lady will be taking him there.

                          And to Parsi: I don't know what kind of magnolia you have. These star magnolia do well in temperate climates, but the large flowered Magnolia grandifolia of the southeast do not take these cold winters in the Midwest. Around buildings you can have microclimates that plants from warmer zones will winter over in. I remember hollyhocks growing up around foundations of houses & barns when I was young, but they would die in the winter in plantings away from heated buildings. Hibiscus & gladioli do the same.

                          Well, the deer are back this morning for a corn treat, as are the turkeys. And then there are squirrels, squirrels, & more squirrels. Grey ones, a black one, red ones, A rare flying one at night, & chipmunks, & 13-lined ground squirrels (gophers). Take care.
                          SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

                          Comment


                            ((((((Ralph)))))) ~

                            Thank you for sharing photos of your prairie and wildlife, and for educating us on nature.

                            I'm sorry that Marty is losing his appetite. Sadly, that is common, and it is often a sign that the body is wearing out. If he would tolerate a supplement, I recommend Orgain, which is a plant based protein drink. Orgain can be ordered on line at Orgain.com. It is far superior to Ensure or any other typical supplements.

                            Three days of doctor appointments, when Marty is not doing well, is a lot of stress and requires energy, which Marty may not have. His physicians may recommend that Marty consider Hospice now. I can testify that it is better to have Hospice sooner rather than later.

                            Is Marty having any kind of treatments?

                            You, Marty, his family, and all of your friends are in my prayers.

                            As always, agate, thank you so much for keeping us connected with Ralph.

                            Love & Light,



                            Rose

                            *Virtual Hugs Are Germ-Free!


                            THANKS!


                            Mom to Jon, 49, & Michael, 32, born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Angel Jon received his wings in 2019. In 2020, Jim, their Dad, joined them.

                            Comment


                              From Tom Cat today:


                              This is the morning scene outside. The magnolia tree is whiter than white. It's the first time here I'm going to see tulips blooming in the snow. A cool 30 start for the day.

                              Need to get Marty over to the nearby hospital; 23 miles out, for a COVID-19 test again. He's on palliative care, but nothing where they're coming to the house to see him. This COVID-19 swab could have been done yesterday, when he had a conference 60 miles out, with his oncologist. His neighbor lady & I aren't allowed to be with him for tests or conferences since we're not kin. Time to get on the road with Marty. Take care. More later. (7:17 AM)


                              Hi Rose & others. Got Marty in for his COVID-19 swab. An hour round trip, and him struggling in, [then] getting sent back to the car. They had him swab, & we left. Apparently when you're having tests and procedures, they take a swab now and then. It would be nice if they took the swab after the procedure and send it to the lab from there. Having a patient catch a ride for 20 some miles or more for what can be done at any one of the hospitals, at procedure times, seems very insensitive. These hospitals are under the same management, and you can only reach them at a central booking place. You cannot call the independent hospital or doctor directly. Getting through takes a minimum of 15 to 30 minutes. If you're computer-literate you can e-mail them or whatever.

                              Marty is home now, resting before having more breakfast. They have him on "Ensure" right now. Getting up & walking through the house is about as good as he can do right now.

                              The snow has melted back now, except for under some areas of the woods. Turkeys out too. 4 to 5 hens and about the same toms & jakes. Having a second grilled cheese breakfast now. Take care.


                              My reply:

                              It's shameful that Marty's medical care is far from accessible. I'm glad that the neighbor lady seems to be helping with the transportation but hospice if available might need to be requested specifically. Just the travel alone must be hard on him--and on his helpers as well.--You may be more computer-literate than you realize. If you can post photos in this messaging system, you could probably handle e-mail easily. It might be a faster way to contact medical providers? There has to be a way to ease things for Marty--and for you. I hope one will be found.

                              I've posted your photo and message on BrainTalk--people are slow about getting back there with the upgrade because it's hard for some to log in. The changes there are significant and will take some getting used to. Even the administrators are "adjusting" and it will take time.

                              Best wishes to you and the cats--
                              Last edited by agate; 04-14-2021, 08:28 AM.
                              SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

                              Comment


                                The scene Ralph sent from out his window is beautiful. It looks like it snowed there overnight. It probably did. I am sorry Marty is having such a hard time and also that is hard on Ralph or whomever carries him to and from these appointments. Ralph I truly hate to say this, but it is probably down hill for Marty from here on out and I would think hospice would be the best route. Not in hospice house, but where they come to him. I went this route taking care of my husband and I know how hard it can be. Thankfully, I was younger and healthier at the time.
                                Virginia

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X