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    Messages from Tom Cat - 2

    The thread with messages from Tom Cat was getting long, and this seems like a good time to start a new one because he has just sent us such a nice photo of his cat Maggie:



    This is Maggie on top of the couch cushions. She jumps up here when I take five at different times in the day. She likes to get petted up there. She blends in well with the upholstery, eh?
    Last edited by agate; 10-12-2021, 08:14 PM.
    SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatopa (glatiramer acetate = Copaxone) since December 2020.

    #2
    She's just a happy cat waiting for her "cat daddy" to pet her. So sweet Ralph!
    Virginia

    Comment


      #3
      From Tom Cat (Wednesday):
      Waking up late this morning. It's always rush time for me, with some breakfast for me, a canned food snack for Smudge and Maggie, the litter clean up, then crashing in the living room chair for a bit.

      Maggie is back on the blanket-covered box next to me. She gets head scratches from there. And big baby Smudge has had belly rubs by now, and a good brushing since she sheds a bit.

      I'm glad everyone like the photo of Maggie on the couch pillows. She does look like a momma cat in control there, eh?

      Need to get stuff moved around, since Naomi, our cleaning lady, will be here. Not sure exactly what all I want her to do. If she and her assistant move too much out of place, it takes me forever to get it back. The floor is literally covered with papers and magazines. I'd like to get most of the windows washed.

      Temperature holding around.55 at night and 65 in the days. Warm still for this time of the year. Unfortunately almost every day it has rained some.

      The cats got their wool and polartex blankets washed yesterday, so they should sleep better now.

      Need to get some winter squash in the oven and baked. I have acorn and butternut. The acorn takes less than an hour, but the butternut takes almost double that time. I really like the winter squash, but am just learning how to bake it now. My experience with it was roasting it on an open camp fire with a Menominee friend years back. That was with a couple of wood ducks. He shot the ducks, and I got to wade out in water waist-deep to get them. That was in November. Anything on that fire would have tasted good. I was adventurous and just as crazy back then.

      Take care
      .



      It's the prairie in the back yard and what I have for TV reception these days 3/4 of the time. Joe will be gone for a couple of weeks. When he's back he'll see if turning the antenna will help. I do like to get the weather and news each day.

      Time to get going for the day. Take care
      ..
      SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatopa (glatiramer acetate = Copaxone) since December 2020.

      Comment


        #4
        I've been slow about getting Tom Cat's messages posted because of a couple of problems here but I'll try to catch up now, particularly since he discusses the dollhouses he and Cat Dancer put together. I had asked him about them, and those who remember her posts with the photos might be interested to know more about them now. I told him that Ann also posted the story she wrote to go with the dollhouses, "Catterville," here on BrainTalk.

        Thursday:
        Yeah, Maggie is having it hard to keep her aloof cat persona intact. She's liking those pets and belly rubs more each day. I got 4 or 5 4oz jars with treats at night. The girl is getting fussy. The other night, I had to open the 3rd jar before she wanted a treat. It's like,"Hey, dad, you can do better than this," eh?

        I'm getting ready to go out and finally finish seeding my half-dozen driveway ditch drains. Had Naomi, Ann's and my cleaning lady, with an assistant come and start doing room clean-ups. Would be nice to have a room for eating or coffee with company, eh? This has been a real struggle with me. I'd take a picture of the mess, but it might break the camera lens. Take care.

        Saturday:

        The Kindle I'm on is Ann's. It has an ​e-mail app. To use it you had to have the password. I have two typewritten sheets of passwords Ann left me. I have yet for any of them to let me into her e-mail box on the Kindle.

        I'm trying to find a senior center in the area that may have a program for adults on how to use a computer. I'm going to need some hands-on training because I haven't found a how-to-do-it manual that I could figure it out with. At the same time, I'm trying to figure out how to start a Kindle of my own. When Joe transferred me to Ann's I lost many contacts up north, of my fur trade friends, all my online games, how to brighten or lower the light in the screen, how to buy things outside of Amazon, how to get my standard keyboard back (I got a split keyboard now), etc. Joe would fix everything in cyberspace for me, but he doesn't have the time or patience to teach me. I'm trying to be calm and cool about this, but it is frustrating. I really don't like being a grumpy old man, but sometimes that's what comes out. Sorry, this isn't something you should have to hear about.

        I know with the computer I have a standard typewriter board. 20 years back I did okay on the typewriter, but they stopped making them, and I pretty much stopped writing folks. That's about it for this day.

        Got a bunch of prairie plant seeds cleaned, and that's about it. The hunters were out, with no success today. Windy, clear, and cool, mainly in the 50s. Maggie's at the foot of the basement steps, checking out any mice there may be around down there. Smudge is probably at the foot of the bed, or on the floor next to it. The TV has been working 2/3 the time in the last few days, so I may watch some program tonight.

        You take care, and I'll be looking for senior computer classes
        .


        From Monday, 10/18:

        As to the dollhouses, around 23 finished ones, Ann wanted them to go to the dollhouse museum in Nebraska. They never called back. My sister thought a museum in Oshkosh, my home town, and where Ann worked in the library, might like them too. That's only 35 miles out. What no one but I realize is moving them and then setting them up is quite an undertaking. It takes hours of preparation to stabilize everything inside, or remove, box, and replace the people and furnishings when you get them to their destination. I'd say it will take weeks to put things together and move them. And you can only move 1 to 3 of them at a time, in a large van, or enclosed pickup. Her largest, the Garfield, is 41 x 34 x 40 inches high. That would only fit in a large van. It's not going to happen before next summer, and I think I will be doing the prep and the moving.

        Almost all the main cat figures are handmade, by a lady in ? Nebraska. They are porcelain cats, from British molds. Ann purchased these from an English auction [from?] the lady who made them. ... Plus she wrote a very nice manuscript of "Catterville."

        As things progress here I'll keep all of you in touch. Time to go for the day. Need to check out a small engine repair shop, groceries and get driveway drains seed, etc. Take care.
        Also yesterday:

        The advantage of having it in the Oshkosh City Museum is that itt would be where many of her friends are, and probably my nephews and nieces would go there. It is in a large lumber boss's mansion from the late 1800's. I think they would display it well. A lot of people would know who Ann was there. I think she worked with the League of Women Voters there.

        I may have to get a new camera to shoot all the rooms in the doll houses. Even the small ones are very well decorated. Also the museum may interview me on her behalf. And it's close enough for me to go to.

        Time for lunch. I got groceries,and found out from my auto shop that the small engine repair place I was going to check out is closed. They know another guy who works part time on small engines. I'm crossing my fingers. Take care
        .
        I'd like to reply to him with a couple of suggestions but before I do, I'd appreciate some input from people here because I don't know much about these things:

        I think he should have the dollhouse collection appraised. He gave an estimate of what he thinks it's worth (and I left that part out of his message) but I think he's underestimating it. Also, having an appraiser come in might not be possible due to COVID restrictions?

        I think he could easily take photos without getting a new camera if he has a smartphone or maybe even with the Kindle. But he needs to learn how to use them. And it sounds as if he's caught between a rock and a hard place right now when it comes to mastering computers and the Internet.

        And if I recall the photos of the dollhouses, they looked quite impressive to me. I should think that a museum might be so glad to have the collection that they would take care of the packing and shipping.

        I had always thought that the dollhouses might be donated to various hospitals where children could enjoy them but apparently they are more for collectors.

        Last edited by agate; 10-19-2021, 08:22 AM.
        SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatopa (glatiramer acetate = Copaxone) since December 2020.

        Comment


          #5
          I agree about getting them appraised Agate. I definitely think they should be. Surely they can come in and do it safely, like maybe with mask on.

          Really good pictures should be taken that are very detailed, so that if anything happens to any of them they can be restored I think.

          As far as putting them in children's hospitals, I would have a concern that maybe they would get damaged. Also, if they are not kept together it might not be as impressive.

          I remember the pictures Cat posted of them as being quite impressive, also the story she wrote about Catterville. I think a copy of this should be nicely put in a small book form and bound and also put on display. Just trying to come up with ideas here in order to keep Ann's legacy going. She put a lot of time and work into all of this.

          I would think that a museum could come in and box them and have pictures to go by to put them back together and move them pretty well. Surely they have people that know how to do this.

          All of this is just my opinion. I have had no experience with this type thing and none with how to get the ball rolling to get it started. I would think very good, detailed pictures might be the first thing. I wish Ralph could get a professional photographer to do this. They know so much more about what angles to shoot pictures from.

          I wish a museum would kind of take over and do this so Ralph would not have to. It might be a big headache for him, but a small thing for a museum.
          Virginia

          Comment


            #6
            Virginia, your comments are precisely what I was thinking too. I'm sure that a museum is a much better place than a hospital setting.I'm glad to know that his (and her) plans have been to donate the collection to a museum where it can be appreciated and preserved.
            SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatopa (glatiramer acetate = Copaxone) since December 2020.

            Comment


              #7
              ((((((Hugs to All)))))) ~

              agate ~

              Obviously, I hadn't read this thread before I posted in your other thread about the dollhouses.

              I agree with you that the collection should be appraised. Has Ralph contacted the Oshkosh museum? That is where he should begin. He can send them the photos he has as they are, just so that the curator can get an idea of what they look like. I would also include her story, "Catterville," and an explanation of Ann's connection to Oshkosh.

              If the museum is interested in acquiring the collection, I would guess that the museum would send an appraiser to determine its value. Perhaps the museum also has a photographer, as they probably need detailed photographs of all of the pieces shown in the museum. The museum may also have access to professional packers, who could crate the dollhouses and remove them in a large truck to take to the museum.

              I don't think Ralph should have to do any work associated with the packing and delivering. This is a donation to the museum, so they should do everything.

              I think Ralph should call the Oshkosh museum first and speak to the curator. Depending upon how much space they have available and how large the collection is, they may not be able to take it. Or, they may decide that it isn't worth the cost of the appraiser, photographer, and professional packers for some reason. Rather than ruminate over this, Ralph should just call the museum.

              The museum curator might even suggest another alternative location to display Ann's collection.

              Because Ann's dollhouses are works of art and not toys, I don't think it would be appropriate for them to be in a school or hospital, unless they are behind glass.

              Winter is approaching, which is probably not the best time to be pursuing this, but at least he could call the museum to find out whether the curator would be interested.

              Ralph is living off the grid for sure, by the looks of his TV reception. I certainly do not have that inclination to live off the grid, and I admire folks, who do. Self-sufficiency is the key to that life.

              Thank you, as always, for keeping us connected to Ralph.

              Love & Light,

              ❤️❤️❤️❤️

              Rose

              *Virtual Hugs Are Germ-Free!


              THANKS!
              Mom to Jon, 49, & Michael, 32, born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Angel Jon received his wings in 2019. In 2020, Jim, their Dad, joined them.

              Comment


                #8
                From Tom Cat yesterday:
                I'm not going anywhere with the doll houses and furnishings at this time. Until I get myself in order there isn't going to be anything happening with the Oshkosh Public Museum, or any other institute at this time. I know Ann did not want it sold. I know she was thinking of donating it to an American doll house Institute in Nebraska, but there never was any formal contract with them to my knowledge.

                Right now I'm trying to get everything together for another long lonely winter. The weather is cooling off fast, it's been raining by late today, and the elevator guy is coming tomorrow to fix the leaking hydraulic lift cylinder. It's tricky, and I'll be helping him to a degree.

                Eating good, but not sleeping worth anything. Too many things on the mind right now. Birds in the feeders and a turkey under the bedroom window, for a while in the afternoon. She was eating fallen sunflower seeds from the feeders. And that's about it for the day. Got a part from UPS a couple of hours ago, to put on the ATV plow lift. Another project, but an electric blade lift, so I don't have to lift the blade manually after 20 years. That should make things easier.

                Take care
                .
                SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatopa (glatiramer acetate = Copaxone) since December 2020.

                Comment


                  #9
                  From Tom Cat on Thursday:

                  Sitting here this morning, having my 1st cup of coffee. It's 45 out right now, overcast, and having rain on and off all night. Thinking what I might need to do outside today.

                  The elevator repair guy is coming around 1 to 2 PM today. Crossing my fingers that everything will be taken care of today. Just looking at my first bird of the day, out of the living room window. It's a downy woodpecker. He or she is here every morning these last few weeks. Nice to have a feathered friend outside each day. When you start anthropomorphising all the critters around you, you know you've been isolated too long, eh? I may be okay, as long as I don't start bringing them inside, eh?

                  The TV has been working most of the time now, so our broadcasts out of Green Bay must have gotten a new satellite or something. Hope this lasts a while. Like Ann, I'm a news and political junky. If I get the news and weather twice a day, I'm okay. . The dish services try to lure you in at around $30 a month to start, but fail to tell you that there is the federal FAA charge of about $45, no matter what size package you get.

                  Really windy out this morning, 25mph winds on and off all day. Need to get a little more breakfast & step outside for a bit. Cats are crawled up under the bed and dresser right now.

                  Glad to hear from you and others on BT. Keeps me going, and attached to the outside world.

                  Take care.






                  This is me and Maggie the cat:

                  SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatopa (glatiramer acetate = Copaxone) since December 2020.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Ralph, sometimes it helps just to go and treat yourself to a cup of coffee and maybe a sausage biscuit. I use to do that. Now if I treat myself it is mostly to get a salad at lunch. I haven't had a biscuit in probably years and would not know where to go get one. During COVID lockdown I have a brother who use to go to a place near him called Biscuitville. He would get an egg biscuit and coffee at the drive thru and pull over and just sit and eat it. He said just being out in the car helped him. It wasn't far from him and it didn't cost a lot but it helped to just see people thru the drive-in window he said. He use to tell me to get out and drive in my car. However, for me it didn't help because I live in high traffic.

                    Many of us on here have suffered through what you are going through and it is a very hard journey to be on. Try not to isolate yourself. It use to be hard for me to force myself to go anywhere, but it does get easier. You need something to look forward to. That's the reason I mentioned going out for coffee in the mornings and trying to establish something that is a routine that you feel you can keep doing. There will be times during the winter when you cannot get out, so try to do something that will take you out each day while you can.

                    Has anyone moved into Marty's house yet? Just wondering what is going to happen to his place.

                    Some days will be easier for you than others. When the hard days come just remember that the good days will come back. Time and more time is what it takes and if you are like me you get impatient. Agate is a very good source for you and I am glad that you are keeping up with her. It is always good for us to hear from you through her.

                    By the way, since you seem to enjoy working outside and doing things with your hands, I have been wondering if there might be a place close enough to you that offers some classes in things that interest you such as woodworking, and anything that you have an interest in. Keep letting us hear from you.

                    Take care,
                    Virginia




                    Thanks Agate!
                    Last edited by Virginia; 10-23-2021, 06:32 AM.
                    Virginia

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Good to hear from Tom Cat.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        From Tom Cat on Monday:
                        Thank you Virginia, & Ikoiko, and especially you Joan (Agate) for putting all my ramblings out there for everyone to see.
                        It's another cool, 40 day, going up to 50. No rain in particular, but damp and gloomy.. Also heavy winds, with 25 mph gusts. Blew the leaves off my drive and the pine needles off Marty's drive. His sister, Kay, will be here today, meeting with financial folks, and a realtor, and friends of Marty's coming up from Milwaukee.

                        I'll be heading out at noon for one of my biweekly blood draws and a hemoglobin shot.

                        Taking pictures is hard with this Kindle of Ann's. She has a 3 second delay on the shutter. So I have to try and figure out where the subject will be in 3 seconds. It's frustrating, and& I have no idea why she set it that way. I know she never liked working with cameras. I took almost all the pictures, and she really didn't like me taking pictures of her.

                        Oh, boy. Need to get something for breakfast, wash up, & get ready to go. Take care
                        .

                        And from Wednesday:

                        Time for a cup of coffee, and then I'll be having tea and a breakfast with Kay, Marty's sister. She's back here for a few days, getting finances in order, and closer to putting up the house for sale.

                        Take care
                        .
                        SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatopa (glatiramer acetate = Copaxone) since December 2020.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          ((((((Ralph)))))) ~

                          Watching Marty's house up for sale may be a bit difficult for you, I would imagine. You have so many wonderful memories on your prairie. New folks come in and don't know the history. I do hope that your new neighbors will be kind, caring people, who love the prairie as much as you, Ann, Marty, and his wife.

                          Have you thought about getting a smart phone/iPhone? Taking pictures and videos with them is so simple. I've never had a Kindle, and I don't know anyone who uses a Kindle anymore. I took the plunge into 21st century technology this year, and so should you!

                          I hope that all went well with your blood draw and that your results are good.

                          Take good care of yourself, Ralph ~ Prayers, positive, healing energy always on the way to you ~

                          Love & Light,

                          ❤️❤️❤️❤️

                          Rose

                          *Virtual Hugs Are Germ-Free!


                          THANKS!
                          Mom to Jon, 49, & Michael, 32, born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Angel Jon received his wings in 2019. In 2020, Jim, their Dad, joined them.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            From Tom Cat today:
                            To Rose and all of you. I don't know how I'll react when Marty's property is sold. Joe's interested in it for his one autistic son, and I showed him through it for Kay; Marty's sister.

                            I took another fellow through it, with Kay's permission, and also through Marty's and my prairies. He is a prairie enthusiast, and a member of the same prairie group as I , and so were Marty and our late spouses. He would definitely be a good neighbor.

                            Right now I think Kay, Marty's sister, has only told the prairie folks that the house is up for sale. I do think they want to sell it before the snow flies. It has a terrible 600-foot gravel drive to navigate in winter.

                            And as for my biweekly blood test and hemoglobin shot, this time it was as high as it ever has been. It will probably never be normal, but that's understandable. This is one of those gene disorders that 20 years back they had no idea about. It goes with 2 other blood disorders, which are under control right now. Add the osteoarthritis and other age-related things, and I should be glad I'm doing as well as I am.

                            The furry kids, my cats, are on a box with blankets next to me now. And the messages from you folks keep me from going bonkers in these days when this COVID-19 isolation takes its toll. I'll look into the i-phones this fall/winter while I think of getting on a new Kindle Fire or the computer of Ann's I have. I need to find out what county, state, etc., senior programs may be available. I need hands-on help for this with people who have lots of patience.

                            Take care and virtual hugs to all of you.
                            SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatopa (glatiramer acetate = Copaxone) since December 2020.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Ralph, I do wish the fellow from the same prairie group as you would buy Marty's house. If he likes the house alright it sounds like it would be a good fit for both of you.

                              I do hope you will take care of yourself. If your hemoglobin shot doesn't seem to be working like it should, it might be a good idea to see your Doctor again. Please take care of your health as best as you can.

                              I am going for a flu shot Wednesday and I was wondering if you have had yours yet. Do you get one every year?

                              By the way, I just ordered a Kindle Fire Tablet. I got it on sale at QVC (the TV shopping network). They are $149.99 on Amazon and I got the same tablet for $87.99. I will transfer all my regular kindle books over to it and I hope to be able to figure out how to come on the internet. I would like to learn to come on here and read the news on the internet on it. All my banking will remain on my desktop computer.

                              I'll let you know how it goes. Hope you and your two fur kids are doing okay. We enjoy hearing from you.

                              Take care,
                              Virginia
                              Virginia

                              Comment

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