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My feral rehab

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    My feral rehab

    This is Miss Louise, she is the feral rehab that was brought to me in February of 2018 fully feral, she was vetted and I was fostering her for a rescue while we waited for a barn opening. She really loved her food and fell in love with her feeder, me. So I decided to take her on so she could at least be adopted by someone who understood shy kitties. When the other three went to their barn after about 6 weeks, she stayed with me. I began to get anxiety over the thought of building her trust and then sending her to live with someone else and probably having to start all over again. Soooo after about a year and a half, I decided I just couldn't do it to her. so she has stayed with us. Every week she does something that surprises me. This patting of my face is brand new, I think it is absolutely adorable, too bad she has murder claws.LOL. Maybe someday I will be able to trim her nails.

    #2
    Oh. oh, oh, how SWEET. Bless your big heart for being so good to a feral cat.

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      #3
      ((((((Chris)))))) ~

      How fortunate is Miss Louise to have you as her Mama! In time, she will show you more affection, as she gets used to being in your care.

      In the 1980s, a mama and her 3 kittens wandered into my yard. The kittens warmed up to me, but mama was cautious. I fed them outside, and that began a cascade of feral kittens delivered to my yard over a few years. Some disappeared, probably captured by a coyote or hawk. I was able to trap the kittens and take them to a local private, nonprofit shelter, where they would be placed for adoption. I always made a financial donation, as well donated food.

      The initial 3 kittens remained in my care, until the two males disappeared. The female kitten remained, living in our backyard, where she was the Queen for 17 years. As she was fading, one of the males reappeared. After 17 years? Jim and I were astonished. He stayed until she passed, then left. I can only imagine that he was living with another caring family all of that time, and somehow he knew that she was ill.

      Our cocker spaniel was a stray, who like the cats, were abandoned in our neighboring park, like they were disposable. She wandered into our garage, as Jim was backing in the van. I shouted for him to stop. He got out, and we looked at her, and her eyes said, "Hi, I'm your dog."

      With patience, Jim trained our cat and dog to become friends. And they did.

      Our dog had clearly been rejected by other neighbors, but she came to the right home when she walked into our garage. She had seizures. Fortunately for her, we knew all about seizures. She brought joy into our world for 11 years.

      Every animal deserves love, care, a safe home, and a good life. Thank you, Chris, for giving this to so many of your foster and adopted kittens. Therapy is mutual with animals. Love is Love.

      Love & Light,

      ❤️❤️❤️❤️

      Rose
      Mom to Jon, 49, & Michael, 32, born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Angel Jon received his wings in 2019. In 2020, Jim, their Dad, joined them.

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        #4
        That's really remarkable success there. I've heard that it's next to impossible for a feral cat to warm up to any human being but you've managed.

        As for the claws, trimming them isn't so hard. If you haven't ever done it, there are videos demonstrating the technique--but you do need the special claw clippers but they don't cost much. Or maybe you knew all this but just hesitate to try trimming this cat's claws because of her special history. I found that getting the cat when it's asleep and doing just a couple of claws each time worked well with cats who were inclined to get unpleasant. And placing the cat in a drawstring bag with just its head sticking out was a way to keep from getting clawed.
        SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

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          #5
          Rose what a beautiful story about your kitties. And 17 years, that's amazing. Aren't they just so incredible? Sometimes one of them will grace me with a particular show of love and it just makes me feel closer to God and I always thank Him for the opportunity to be his servant in such a way. What luck that pooch had that day finding you guys.

          Agate LOL, I'm sorry but I had to laugh at the thought of me trying to stuff poor traumatized Miss Louise in a bag. I would wind up in the ER to be treated for mortal wounds. I have been attempting to touch them there paws for four years, she's not giving. It's not that I don't know how to trim her nails because I do, in fact, I just bought new clippers not long ago, but there is no way she would allow me to do that and I wouldn't want to put her through the trauma it would take to put her in the bag. She does not let me pick her up and protests even if I try to move her from my spot. We cannot play together except very little because she uses claws to grab my hands, especially if I rub her belly and then she wants to play. Mostly she tries to be gentle and she bites but not hard so I know she was with her litter mates long enough to learn not to.

          I believe that there is a big difference in feral kitties that can determine whether or not they can become friendly and that is whether or not they were loved by humans when they were born and still young. I think Louise at one time was in an indoor litter of kitties that was loved on by humans and for whatever reason was thrown out at a young age. When I got her they estimated her age at about 5 so she is 9 now. I think she was outside for a long time. She was living with a group that was living at a motel that a group trapped and I fostered for. Kitties that are born to feral moms have a very short window of time before they are deemed unrehabbable (is that a word LOL). Usually in months. If a feral mom is trapped the kittens are removed as soon as they are eating something besides mom's milk.

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            #6
            Sounds as if feral kitties are different compared to the cats I've known. I would "bag" a cat when it was asleep but I had to work fast. And the cats were usually female and not very large (up to 12 lbs.).
            SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

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              #7
              poor Lousie wouldn't 'speak' to me for a month, she'd go back to hiding under my bed. I could prollly scoop her into a bag but then I don't know about getting that single paw out lol.

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                #8
                Originally posted by houghchrst View Post
                poor Lousie wouldn't 'speak' to me for a month, she'd go back to hiding under my bed. I could prollly scoop her into a bag but then I don't know about getting that single paw out lol.
                It can be done for the front paws. If the kitty has calmed down you can remove the bag to get at the back paws. You do want to make absolutely sure of your technique so you don't end up hurting the kitty. Cut too much claw off and the cat is in considerable pain.

                SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

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                  #9
                  oh it is such a joy to "see" each and every one of you. makes not sleeping all night worth it. i am so happy to have found the laptop and get it charged up so i can , cat lovers and all. i wish i could type a long page but hands are still a big problem. i am at home unless i have a doctor or dentis appointment for the most part. cats are both loving and keep me company when hubby has to leave to do errands etc. luckily he helps with them. most every night the hubby and myself and the 2 cats aLL share the same bed. makes for a warm place on a cold night, lol. take care all. i am going topost this before i lose it again.
                  from joy
                  bonnie


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                    #10
                    This is something I have considered trying. Especially one for my dachshunds, I take them to the vet to get trimmed. I know how to trim their nails. I used to do it all the time for Dash when he was younger and we kept up with the kittens and pups when I worked at the pet store. Dash struggled so hard the first time at the vet that he expressed his own anal glands. All over the vet, me, the room, the tech. Was one of the worst smells I have ever smelled LOL. They got a good laugh and said they normally charge $15 for that.
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                      #11
                      That looks like a solution! Wonder what the sling would be attached to? It looks as if the kitty's paws would still be in contact with the ground.

                      Yes, those anal glands! I used to try expressing them myself so as to avoid worse problems that I heard can happen. I really tried hard to avoid trips to the vet.
                      SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

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                        #12
                        Nope you hang it, everything you need to do so comes with it. I would hang it in a doorway. Maybe add some hooks in the top of my bathroom doorway.

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