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    marijuana and opiod epedemic

    Experts have proposed using medical marijuana to help Americans struggling with opioid addiction. Now, two studies suggest that there is merit to that strategy.


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    #2
    It's really fascinating to see the discussion around the potential benefits of medical marijuana in tackling the opioid epidemic. The recent studies pointing towards its merit are quite intriguing. Moreover, CBD products seem to be gaining traction in this regard.

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      #3
      These two recent studies seem to indicate that there might be some value in exploring the use of CBD products as a potential tool in helping those who are struggling with opioid addiction.

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        #4
        Absolutely, greatido, it's encouraging to see that recent studies are hinting at the potential of CBD products as a tool in addressing the opioid epidemic. This is an issue that has affected many lives, and finding innovative approaches to help those struggling with opioid addiction is crucial.

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          #5
          They are now stepping things up with psilocybin, MDMA, and Ketamine for treating addiction, mental illness, and pain. I will be starting microdosing psilocybin soon. I'm sick of the medications and riding the mental health rollercoaster so I am going to microdose and get off the last 12 of what was more than 18 meds, hopefully. I use THC/CBD for pain, anxiety, and a few other things. I am a chronic pain patient but thanks to the CDC, DHS, and the DEA who are slowly phasing down opioid production, have refused to treat me because I take a benzo for insomnia. Not a word about the THC because it is legal in my state.

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            #6
            Really--18 meds? That is quite a substantial number. It must keep you busy just keeping track of them--refilling them, etc. Hope you can cut down on some of them.
            SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatopa (glatiramer acetate = Copaxone) since December 2020.

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              #7
              agate filling them is ridiculous. There is a period of time during the month when for like a whole week they are filling things. I would go get three and the next day two more were ready so now I just wait. I have them lying down in a drawer and when I take one I turn the bottle around so that when I get ready to take my bedtime meds the bottles should be facing a different way meaning I need to take them. Then when I take those I turn the bottles around so they are all facing the same way. Yep is a bit of a hassle.

              I told my primary I wanted to get off some of my meds and she said, 'but they are all for something different' LOL. I see her soon and am asking to start titrating down off of one of my meds I have been taking for probably 15 years from my PM doc at the time. The withdrawals are absolutely brutal so I am going slow and easy and am waiting to start dosing before I start going down.

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                #8
                Sounds as if it would be all too easy to make a mistake with the meds. You've probably already tried those little pill storage containers where you can set up the pills for a whole week at a time, putting them into individual compartments, but I find one of those indispensable. You might need more than one pill dispenser with so many meds but it just might work. There are a zillion types available, and the ones that don't beep or do anything fancy don't cost much.
                SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatopa (glatiramer acetate = Copaxone) since December 2020.

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                  #9
                  FWIW to anyone reading, I use a checklist instead of the storage containers to track my meds. (I print the lists on 3x5 cards. This is easy to do, even on a cheap laser printer. I also use both sides of the cards.)

                  I have to take meds four times a day. Another one, Fosamax, I have to take once a week. I could not find containers that would work for me on this schedule.

                  Every time I take meds, I put a bar towel on the counter, then I put the pills on the towel. I then mark the meds off on the checklist before I take them. I have to admit I have gotten confused a few times, but this is mostly working for me so far.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Expworer View Post
                    Absolutely, greatido, it's encouraging to see that recent studies are hinting at the potential of CBD products as a tool in addressing the opioid epidemic. This is an issue that has affected many lives, and finding innovative approaches to help those struggling with opioid addiction is crucial.
                    Additionally, you should have tried relaxation techniques or maybe even tried Delta 9 THC gummies.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Expworer View Post

                      Additionally, you should have tried Only registered and activated users can see links., Click Here To Register....
                      These gummies offer a different approach, providing relaxation without the typical psychoactive effects of THC. It's fascinating how various methods can potentially contribute to the overall well-being of individuals in recovery.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by flatcap View Post
                        FWIW to anyone reading, I use a checklist instead of the storage containers to track my meds. (I print the lists on 3x5 cards. This is easy to do, even on a cheap laser printer. I also use both sides of the cards.)

                        I have to take meds four times a day. Another one, Fosamax, I have to take once a week. I could not find containers that would work for me on this schedule.

                        Every time I take meds, I put a bar towel on the counter, then I put the pills on the towel. I then mark the meds off on the checklist before I take them. I have to admit I have gotten confused a few times, but this is mostly working for me so far.
                        This sounds very precise. Since my printer and I don't always get along well, I'd just write on the cards by hand if I wanted to be that well organized. I used to have small memo pads and would write down the time of day I took a pill, using a page for each day and listing each type of pill on every day's record.

                        Fosamax is an exception for me too. It won't fit in the pill container because of the way it's packaged. I have a note to myself that I leave by my bedside the night before the day for Fosamax. I do have to put on my glasses to read the note but I can use the same note each week.

                        It's too hard to forget that it has to be taken first thing in the morning with no other meds and with 8 oz. of water and then I have to stay upright for at least half an hour. Yes, Fosamax is in a class by itself.

                        Also Claritin. It comes in individually wrapped blisterpacks or whatever they're called. I rip out 7 of those every week and leave that strip of pills on my desk where I'll be sure to see them. I've slipped up a few times but I usually realize that some time during the day because I'll be more hoarse than usual.

                        SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatopa (glatiramer acetate = Copaxone) since December 2020.

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by Expworer View Post

                          These gummies offer a different approach, providing relaxation without the typical psychoactive effects of THC. It's fascinating how various methods can potentially contribute to the overall well-being of individuals in recovery.
                          Not to argue, but Delta 9 THC "can absolutely get you high." This quote comes from the product page you linked to.

                          I would probably take them anyway and might in fact try them. I don't use opiods, but I can see how they might be good for other issues. Thank you for posting a source.
                          Last edited by flatcap; 12-31-2023, 12:09 PM.

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                            #14
                            Yes, I have like three of those pill-minder things. Just the cheap opaque plastic ones. One big because I was taking a lot of supplements and meds. Two are small and I used to keep them filled then came depression and lack of caring about that and self-care. They are still in my bedside table. I just find it is one more thing I have to keep track of so I do my back-and-forth method. If I open the drawer to take my night meds and the bottles are facing the same way I know I have forgotten my three morning meds. Oops, four. Low D so doc prescribed a multivitamin.

                            I am really hoping the microdosing helps with some of the pain. While the few studies there are, say only certain types, I am hearing promising things from many people in the groups I have joined.

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