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Thread: Article:Women who develop aneurysms more likely to have used HRT or Oral Contraceptiv

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    Default Article:Women who develop aneurysms more likely to have used HRT or Oral Contraceptiv

    A Breakthrough in Cerebral Aneurysm Research
    Friday, October 07, 2011


    A recent study revealed that women who develop cerebral aneurysms were less likely to have taken hormone replacement therapy (HRT ) or oral contraceptives. These results suggest that women who take estrogen may have an extra line of protection against cerebral aneurysms.

    Women have about twice the likelihood of developing cerebral aneurysms than men. The risk of development increases significantly for women as they reach perimenopausal and menopausal age, around 40 and older. Women ages 50 to 59 have an increased risk of a cerebral aneurysm bursting, which may cause stroke or death. Other risk factors include:
    ■a family history of cerebral aneurysm
    ■hypertension
    ■smoking

    About half of the women who develop cerebral aneurysms experience a ruptured aneurysm, which often manifests as a severe, sudden headache, other body aches, vomiting and seizures. Treatment options for cerebral aneurysm are still limited, and the few options available include surgery, blood pressure management and smoking cessation.

    Though past studies may have suggested that estrogen contained in HRT or oral contraceptives may reduce a womanís risk for cerebral aneurysm, these results have not been definitive. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, a division of the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, continues to fund research to learn more about cerebral aneurysm, including the construction of a specialized X-ray system that can noninvasively guide stents that help regulate blood flow for cerebral aneurysm patients.

    The Study

    Research in the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery, a publication of the British Medical Journal, analyzed 60 women diagnosed with cerebral aneurysms. The 60 women were asked about their histories of oral contraceptives and HRT, and the responses were compared with those of 4,682 women in the general public who were surveyed. Compared to the women from the general public, the 60 women with cerebral aneurysms were more likely to have less or no use of oral contraceptives or HRT. These women were also more likely to have begun menopause at an earlier age.

    This study suggests that estrogen may prevent hemorrhagic stroke, a rupturing of cerebral aneurysm. Because estrogen contributes to the structure of blood vessel walls and facilitates the growth of endothelial cells inside the vessels, maintaining a healthy level of estrogen may decrease the chances of cerebral aneurysm. Women often experience significant drops in estrogen levels during menopause, which is why women of that age are more likely to develop cerebral aneurysms.

    The study authors say it may further the understanding of the development of cerebral aneurysm and possible treatments. Learning more about estrogenís effect on this condition may help physicians identify patients at risk and ways to delay or stop the development of cerebral aneurysm.

    MD News October 2011
    http://www.mdnews.com/news/2011_10/n...urysm-research

  2. #2
    Distinguished Community Member Ging's Avatar
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    I wonder if the blood clot issue from hormone replacement therapy is a problem in aneurysm rupture?, it seems to contradict ? Hummm, I will re read this a couple more times to get it in my noggin right side up :)I sometimes get my readings confused ! , I over think stuff too much ? ;)

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    I have been on estrogen since 2009 so this is good news for me!!

    Ging--my OB/Gyn wanted to add Prometrium to my HRT, but then told me with my annie history may make me go off completely because of blood clot issues. She seemed a little worried. She called my headache/trigeminal neuralgia dr. to get his opinion and he was fine with it. She did tell me to take an an aspirin occasionally just in case ;)
    Last edited by sccandice; 10-24-2011 at 05:07 AM.
    Candice-37 years old
    7 mm ophthalmic annie clipped Nov 14, 2007
    4 mm daughter annie clipped March 11, 2009
    September 2009 diagnosed with Trigeminal Neuralgia

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