Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Greater fracture risk possible w/use of antidepressants

  1. #1
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    6,736
    Blog Entries
    11

    Default Greater fracture risk possible w/use of antidepressants

    Use of antidepressants or anti-anxiety drugs might put people with MS at greater risk of fracture, according to the study below:

    Quote:
    Neurology. 2012 May 16.

    Risk of fractures in patients with multiple sclerosis: A population-based cohort study

    Bazelier MT, van Staa TP, Uitdehaag BM, Cooper C, Leufkens HG, Vestergaard P, Herings RM, de Vries F.

    From the Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences (M.T.B., T.-P.v.S., H.G.M.L., F.d.V.), Utrecht University, the Netherlands; General Practice Research Database (T.-P.v.S.), Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency, London; MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit (T.-P.v.S., C.C., F.d.V.), University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; MS Center Amsterdam (B.M.J.U.), VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Institute of Musculoskeletal Sciences (C.C.), University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; The Osteoporosis Clinic (P.V.), Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; and Pharmo Institute (R.M.C.H.), Utrecht, the Netherlands.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To examine the risk of fracture in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) compared with population-based controls.

    METHODS:

    A population-based cohort study was performed in the Dutch PHARMO Record Linkage System (1998-2008). Patients with MS (n = 2,415) were matched by year of birth, sex, and practice to up to 6 patients without MS (controls). We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of fracture in MS. Time-dependent adjustments were made for age, history of disease, and drug use.

    RESULTS:

    During follow-up, there were 59 fractures among patients with MS (2.4%) and 227 fractures among controls (1.8%). Patients with MS had a 1.7-fold increased risk of osteoporotic fracture (HR 1.73 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18-2.53]) and a 4-fold increased risk of hip fracture (HR 4.08 [95% CI 2.21-7.56]).

    The risk of osteoporotic fracture was significantly greater for patients with MS who had been prescribed antidepressants (HR 3.25 [95% CI 1.77-5.97]) or hypnotics/anxiolytics (HR 3.40 [95% CI 2.06-5.63]) in the previous 6 months, compared with controls.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Increased awareness of the risk of hip fracture is warranted in patients with MS, especially in those who have recently been prescribed antidepressants or hypnotics/anxiolytics.

    PMID:22592374


    The abstract from PubMed (May 18, 2012) can be seen here.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

  2. #2
    Distinguished Community Member renee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Up-upstate NY where it gets cooooold.
    Posts
    756

    Default

    Oh, GREAT.

    Better informed than not.

    -r 8>}

  3. #3
    Distinguished Community Member nuthatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    California
    Posts
    962

    Default

    Is this study saying that the use antidepressants makes ones bones more brittle? Bad drugs?
    Of course people with MS are more likely to fall and possibly fracture something. After all, we don't roll (or fall, for that matter) like we once did.
    Or are they implying that perhaps antidepressants make one more carefree, and hence careless?

    AHHH . . . studies . . . such a wonderful way to make a living!
    Gotta love the conclusions . . . DUH !!!!

  4. #4
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    6,736
    Blog Entries
    11

    Default

    nuthatch, they're not saying anything about antidepressants and anti-anxiety drugs. They're just saying that they found a connection between the use of them and the number of fractures in people with MS. This might mean that people who have recently had these drugs prescribed tend to be more frail than those who haven't. Or it might mean that there's something going on chemically--the drugs might have a way of acting on our bodies that hasn't been discovered yet.

    At least that's how I read it. Since it was a fairly large study, involving 2,415 people, it might turn out to have some significance.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

  5. #5
    Distinguished Community Member Frog42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,924

    Default

    It might but then again it might not? Sheesh, reading that article alone is depressing!


    Whatever happens around you, don't take it personally. Nothing other people do is because of you. It is because of themselves. -- Miguel Ruiz

  6. #6
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    6,736
    Blog Entries
    11

    Default

    Correlation doesn't imply causation--I think I've probably garbled that saying but I've heard something like that. Studies can find correlations, but there have to be more studies before the reason can be found. Or maybe there's no reason. It might just be coincidence.

    Still, it's nice to know they're working on the MS problem. Or at least I think it's nice to know.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

  7. #7
    Distinguished Community Member SalpalSally's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    SWOhio
    Posts
    3,569

    Default

    These kinds of expensive studies, just to keep our scientists busily employed, make me ill..grrrrr. I've had MS for over 40 yrs and on ADs for at least 15 yrs. If I didn't break anything, when I fell in the garage in Nov (and didn't), then my bones are not brittle or even close to brittle.

    MS weakens us and so we don't get the proper exercise to keep our bones and muscles strong. We don't eat properly or get enough minerals and vitamins to protect our bones. These things along with heredity and lifestyle heighthen our chances for Osteo.

    And of course, a bunch of MS Peeps are on ADs (go figure), so, if we have MS and have Osteo. and take ADs, then it must be the ADs, right? Rediculous. So all this expensive study did was to lead to more expensive studies.

    Find us a cure or helpful meds, you IDIOTS..


    Sorry Agate, thank you for reporting the study.


    ..
    Last edited by SalpalSally; 06-18-2012 at 10:35 AM.
    Love, Sally


    "The best way out is always through". Robert Frost







Similar Threads

  1. Revised Preventive Measures to Reduce the Possible Risk of Transmission of CJD USA
    By flatfish in forum Creutzfeldt Jakobs Disease (CJD)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-11-2012, 03:25 PM
  2. Maternal Antibodies to Gluten Linked to Schizophrenia Risk in Children
    By Prot in forum Gluten Sensitivity / Celiac Disease
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-10-2012, 04:40 PM
  3. The risk of prion zoonoses
    By flatfish in forum Creutzfeldt Jakobs Disease (CJD)
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-01-2012, 01:36 PM
  4. Risk of cataract and glaucoma in MS
    By agate in forum Multiple Sclerosis
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-26-2011, 09:00 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-31-2011, 10:15 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


BTC Inc's Disclaimer and Privacy Policy

The material on this site is for information & support purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice provided by a licensed health care provider. Always consult your doctor before trying anything that you find online.