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Thread: (Abstract) Decreased bone mineral density and risk of intracranial aneurysm

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    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Default (Abstract) Decreased bone mineral density and risk of intracranial aneurysm

    This abstract of a study in JAMA Neurology (October 16, 2017) discusses a link between lower bone mineral density and a tendency to develop an intracranial aneurysm.

    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/2657540?utm_medium=alert&utm_source=JAMA%20NeurolP ublishAheadofPrint&utm_campaign=16-10-2017
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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    Distinguished Community Member Sherman Peabody's Avatar
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    Fascinating. I looked a little further and found this:

    Bone Mineral Density test

    A bone mineral density (BMD) test is can provide a snapshot of your bone health. The test can identify osteoporosis, determine your risk for fractures (broken bones), and measure your response to osteoporosis treatment. The most widely recognized BMD test is called a central dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, or central DXA test. It is painless—a bit like having an x-ray. The test can measure bone density at your hip and spine.

    The T-Score

    Most commonly, your BMD test results are compared to the ideal or peak bone mineral density of a healthy 30-year-old adult, and you are given a T-score. A score of 0 means your BMD is equal to the norm for a healthy young adult. Differences between your BMD and that of the healthy young adult norm are measured in units called standard deviations (SDs). The more standard deviations below 0, indicated as negative numbers, the lower your BMD and the higher your risk of fracture.

    A T-score between +1 and −1 is considered normal or healthy. A T-score between −1 and −2.5 indicates that you have low bone mass, although not low enough to be diagnosed with osteoporosis. A T-score of −2.5 or lower indicates that you have osteoporosis. The greater the negative number, the more severe the osteoporosis.

    Who Should Get a Bone Density test?

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that all women over age 65 should have a bone density test. Women who are younger than age 65 and at high risk for fractures should also have a bone density test.

    https://www.medicinenet.com/low_test..._t/article.htm

    Sure looks like low-T (testosterone) is the cause of these aneurysms!

    Thanks for sharing!!
    Last edited by Sherman Peabody; 10-18-2017 at 06:43 PM.

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    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Just to avoid confusion here, the T-score in connection with bone mineral density is not the same as the low-T (T for testosterone) in the MedicineNet article you link to.

    T-score in a bone density test shows how much a person's bone density is higher or lower than the bone density of a healthy 30-year-old adult.
    Last edited by agate; 10-19-2017 at 03:07 PM.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
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    Distinguished Community Member Sherman Peabody's Avatar
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    Yeah, when I searched for low T score, I got a lot of "low-T" hits. Thanks for your help!!

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