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Thread: Spinal Cord Injury increases risk of MS

  1. #1
    Distinguished Community Member SuzE-Q's Avatar
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    Default Spinal Cord Injury increases risk of MS

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25545758

    [paragraphs added for ease of reading]

    J Neurotrauma. 2014 Dec 29.

    Spinal cord injury is related to an increased risk of multiple sclerosis: a population-based, propensity score-matched, longitudinal follow-up study.

    Lin C1, Huang Y, Pan S.


    Abstract
    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Trauma to CNS has been postulated to play a role in triggering CNS autoimmune disease. Although the association between traumatic brain injury and MS has been suggested in previous studies, epidemiological data on the association between spinal cord injury (SCI) and MS is still lacking.

    The aim of the present population-based, propensity score-matched, longitudinal follow-up study was therefore to investigate whether patients with SCI were at a higher risk of developing MS. A total of 11913 subjects aged between 20 and 90 years with at least two ambulatory visits with the principal diagnosis of SCI in 2001 were enrolled in the SCI group. We used a logistic regression model that included age, sex, pre-existing comorbidities, and socioeconomic status as covariates to compute the propensity score. The non-SCI group consisted of 59565 propensity score-matched, randomly sampled subjects without SCI. Stratified Cox proportional hazard regression with patients matched by propensity score was used to estimate the effect of SCI on the risk of developing subsequent MS. During follow-up, 5 subjects in the SCI group and 4 in the non-SCI group developed MS.

    The incidence rates of MS were 17.60 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.71 to 41.0) per 100,000 person-years in the SCI group and 2.82 (95% CI, 0.77 to 7.22) per 100,000 person-years in the non-SCI group.

    Compared to the non-SCI group, the HR of MS for the SCI group was 8.33 (95% CI, 1.99 to 34.87, P =0.0037). Our study therefore shows that patients with SCI have an increased risk of developing MS.

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  3. #2
    Distinguished Community Member SalpalSally's Avatar
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    Cause or Trigger?
    Love, Sally


    "The best way out is always through". Robert Frost







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  5. #3
    Distinguished Community Member SuzE-Q's Avatar
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    I wonder if the full article elaborated on whether the SCI was caused by an external event (MVA or falling off a roof, for example).

    I'm afraid the answer to your question though is probably above my paygrade. As in beyond my comprehension or knowledge.

    Good question.

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  7. #4
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    They should have had me in this study. If you read the post "rhyme or reason" you would see why.
    Virginia

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