Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I did not realize this is in Biden’s infrastructure plen!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    I did not realize this is in Biden’s infrastructure plen!

    This is one giant step forward!

    Human infrastructure—


    On Wednesday, the Biden administration made “infrastructure week” less of a joke and more of a reality: the president unveiled his ambitious American Jobs Plan, a gigantic, $2 trillion proposal focusing on upgrading roads, buildings, water lines, and broadband Internet connections. You know, the physical things people imagine when they hear the word “infrastructure.”

    But the plan also addressed some aspects of what people have been calling “human infrastructure,” broadening the term “infrastructure” beyond the traditional definition of bridges and roads to include parts of the caregiving economy.

    The plan explicitly outlined “solidify[ing] the infrastructure of our care economy by creating jobs and raising wages and benefits for essential home care workers” by putting $400 billion toward expanding access to affordable home — or community-based care for older Americans and people with disabilities.

    There are two main points to this:
    1. Expand access to long-term care services through Medicaid to allow beneficiaries to receive services in their own home or community rather than institutions.
    2. And create well-paying caregiving jobs that include benefits and support for workers, including the ability to collectively bargain.
    Now what this means isn’t entirely clear just yet, but it is certainly an acknowledgement by the administration that the country has been experiencing a long-standing caregiving crisis — and that it has big economic implications.

    Caregivers are disproportionately women: They account for roughly 90 percent of home health workers. Black women and Latinas comprise an outsized share of this constituency, making up Only registered and activated users can see links., Click Here To Register.... Most critically, this workforce is chronically underpaid. Wages for essential home care workers are approximately $12 per hour, among the lowest paid workers in our economy. Many of these workers live in poverty. And then there is the completely unpaidwork: Almost 42 million Americans, or 16 percent of all adults, serve as caregivers for relatives 50 or over. These caregivers are, on average, just shy of 50 themselves.

    While the proposal this week would potentially go a long way in serving this essential workforce, there is much more to be done to fix the country’s broken caregiving infrastructure. Biden alluded to doing more to address it in the coming weeks with something he called the American Families Plan, an apparent third part of this American Plan series the administration is rolling out. I anticipate this next part — timing TBD — will have a lot more to do with child care, paid family leave and other aspects of the caregiving economy. And that’s what we’ll be watching for in the coming weeks.

    Only registered and activated users can see links., Click Here To Register...
    Linda~~~~

    Be the kind of woman that when your feet hit the floor each morning the devil says:"Oh Crap, She's up!"..

    #2
    Linda, I had seen that and realized how significant that could be for many of us, however I feel sure it will be taken out. I don't think that anyone on the other side will vote for it and there may be some on Biden's side that do not. But wouldn't it be wonderful if it did happen? I am kind of holding my breath on this one. It would create jobs and that is something they will use as a plus for those who say it is giving away too much. It would also cut down on nursing home cost. It would be a real plus for so many people and their families.
    Virginia

    Comment


    • Lazarus
      Lazarus commented
      Editing a comment
      It may help when the industry realizes that some of us are setting things up on our own. Buying houses and structuring separate residences within them and then collectively hiring health care help as well as other such aides already helping us individually. Collective action by those of us who can manage and who then stay in our own homes/neighborhoods is a monetary incentive that may make this work for medical help and health care workers of every category.

      Some of us have seen this happening and talked about it here in places like Boston where elderly residents of apartments have done this kind of thing.
      This pandemic has disrupted things enough so that there may be chances for changes to entrenched economic structures. At least this particular change is on the front burner.

    #3
    ((((((Hugs to All)))))) ~

    Linda ~

    Thank you so much for posting this! President Biden's plan is long overdue. We all know that if you're older and/or disabled, you are expendable. And, you have to spend every cent you have earned to receive proper care, before Medicaid kicks in.

    As a lifelong caregiver, this is absolutely wonderful news. Not every state has the resources available to provide In Home Supportive Services or the other program, which allowed me to be self-employed as my sons' careprovider. Being paid as their careprovider was a godsend to our family. It also saved the government millions of dollars for their care.

    As Virginia said, this is important for all of us here on BrainTalk. And you may be right, Virginia, that it won't pass, so that's why we need to make our voices heard about how important it is to us and our loved ones to have the support proposed in this plan.

    My guess is that we will be hearing from many organizations representing Seniors and persons with disabilities, like AARP, and disabilities rights and advocacy groups.

    Many years ago, it was not uncommon for people with disabilities and Seniors to march on state capitols, or have "sit ins" in the halls of state and federal buildings. With COVID and the insurrection on January 6, that is no longer an option.

    So many issues are confronting us right now, so I pray that the media covers President Biden's Human Infrastructure Plan with as much attention as is given to the other crises.

    In home care has been "the wave of the future" for decades. The future is here.

    Love & Light,



    Rose

    *Virtual Hugs Are Germ-Free!



    THANKS!
    Mom to Jon, 49, & Michael, 32, born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Angel Jon received his wings in 2019. In 2020, Jim, their Dad, joined them.

    Comment


      #4
      Linda, the link at the end of your post didn't work for me. It went to something that turned out to someone's signature but nothing else. I'm not sure why that happened but some fine tuning of the linking arrangement here may be needed.

      This modification of our health care delivery system by beefing up home health care is desperately needed--and will affect every one of us in one way or another. I am pessimistic about its chances of passing but we can try our best to make it happen.

      Unfortunately the nursing home industry is huge and entrenched and has a powerful lobby, I'm sure. They will not want to see this expansion of provision for home health care workers.

      But nowadays, with Baby Boomers aging, there just may be enough retirees speaking up for there to be some real change.
      Last edited by agate; 04-02-2021, 04:50 PM.
      SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

      Comment


        #5
        Linda, I think the collective way of living and getting medical and aid type help is a great idea. You do have to have enough like minded people to get it done and also you have to work out details of what happens if one of them dies. For instance if the house is owned by several people and one of them dies do the others have the means to pay that person's heirs or can you easily find someone else who is compatible to buy that person's interest. Lots of details.

        A number of years ago I kind of had that in mind and was considering buying a place I found that was all on one floor. It had a master suite at each end. When I was considering this I had in mind a very good friend who I had known since high school. Her husband had also died and she had sold her house, but did not want to buy another one. However, she did not want to live alone either. So, I had her in mind.

        She developed arthritis and was taking medication for it then she took a flu shot. Right after taking the flu vaccine she went on a 4 day trip to Amish country with a group. She became very sick and they decided to have the bus bring them back early. On the way back her heart stopped. The bus driver called 911 in Manassas, Va. She was taken to hospital. Family all went. Dr. told them if her heart stopped again and they brought her back again she would be brain damaged. Her sister signed the papers to DNR and later my friends heart did stop again. The flu vaccine mixed with the arthritis medication was what brought this about. Within a couple of weeks I saw on TV where these two things should not be given at the same time. Her sister had already told me what caused her death. Why her Doctor here in Raleigh who gave her the vaccine did not know this I don't know. I have never had the heart to ask her sister if the family did anything about this.

        When I think of living in a home that is bought by several people I always think of this. But I still think the idea is a good one if details are worked out in advance.
        Virginia

        Comment


        • Lazarus
          Lazarus commented
          Editing a comment
          I have 2 friends and we have talked about this situation as sometimes I wonder what I would do if John died. But I realize my friends might develop more serious illnesses so the set up has to have separate living facilities for us all with maybe sharing community rooms...like co housing units. Or an old fashioned 3 family house that I grew up in!

        #6
        ((((((Hugs to All)))))) ~

        Linda ~

        That sounds like a great idea. As Virginia mentioned, it would require a legal framework to protect all of you. If you are serious about this, it might be a good idea to consult with an attorney, who could explain to the three of you how you could make it work. Knowing the legal parameters and developing a budget would be helpful in deciding whether it is feasible, before you need to do it.

        agate ~

        In the early 90s, a major nursing home corporation attempted to take over our county's In Home Supportive Services program. We knew what their goal was: to reduce IHSS hours of service to recipients, which would then drive the recipients out of their homes and into a nursing facility.

        We organized and attended every hearing with this corporation, voicing our protests and how this would adversely affect recipients. We wrote letters to our Supervisors, the Social Services agency, our state and federal representatives, the Governor, and to major newspapers in the State. We prevailed.

        When advocating, we need to emphasize the cost effectiveness of in home care as opposed to institutional care. That is the number one persuasive argument for any social program. In home care saves the government (taxpayers) money (Medicaid/Medicare) over institutional care. Millions of dollars, in fact.

        Of course, the next important point in advocating for in home care is quality of life for the individual receiving the care. People live longer, when they are in their own home, as long as they are safe, and the level of care provided by health professionals in the home is appropriate.

        With the appropriate in home medical care, trips to the ER can often be avoided. IV's can be given in a home setting. Jim and I were trained by Jon's home health nurse in how to give Jon an IV antibiotic after Jon's hospital discharge in 2012. Imagine how much it would have cost for Jon to remain in the hospital for those 6 days just to get the IV meds. Or in a nursing home.

        Keeping vulnerable people out of a hospital or a doctor's office also reduces exposure to germs, which could cause infections, and then the costs rise to treat the infection. At home, we have "familiar germs," as Jon's infectious disease physician referred to them.

        Once a year, Jon's GI came to our home to change Jon's G Tube. Medicaid saved money on that house call, because Jon would have needed an ambulance to take him and bring him home. Plus an office visit, plus the overhead for the office visit, or a trip to ER. Of course, all of that would have been traumatic for Jon, so ... again ... quality of life is important.

        I think if enough Seniors and their family members advocate for President Biden's plan, there is a possibility it will pass and be enacted. Obviously, there is an enormous need for this Plan, particularly during the pandemic.

        With this plan, many folks here and all over BT, could have their vaccines administered by a home health nurse, which would make it much easier on those, who are less mobile.

        So, let's keep a positive attitude that we can make this change, which is a change we all need.

        Virginia ~

        I am so very sorry that you lost your friend. I just knew the outcome was going to be sad, when you said she had her flu shot with her arthritis medicine. That's why all of you are supposed to space out your MS meds with your vaccine.

        The year before Jim was diagnosed with cancer, he had a major RA flare. He went to our PCP, who convinced Jim to have the pneumonia vaccine. He told Jim it was to protect Jonathan. Within an hour after Jim got home, he was ill. He was in bed for 10 days, and thankfully, I was able to care for him to get him well.

        Doctors make mistakes. It happens. Tragically.

        Let's all put on our Advocate Hats and fight for Joe's plan!

        Love & Light,



        Rose

        *Virtual Hugs Are Germ-Free!



        THANKS!


        Mom to Jon, 49, & Michael, 32, born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Angel Jon received his wings in 2019. In 2020, Jim, their Dad, joined them.

        Comment


        • Lazarus
          Lazarus commented
          Editing a comment
          Thoughtful response. Thanks.
      Working...
      X