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    Decorah eagles

    I hope this will work right. Other people have been better at posting these nesting birds videos but here are the Decorah eagles, For some reason you need to click on the first part of the links below. The second link (the https link that is in bolder type) won't get you to the eagles but the text above that link is the link that will get you there.
    The live eagle cam broadcasts video of baby bald eagles from their nest in Decorah, Iowa. Learn about eagles and watch them hatch, play, eat, & learn to fly.
    Last edited by agate; 04-02-2021, 08:11 AM.
    SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

    #2
    This was posted on the Website on March 28, showing the two eaglets that hatched a couple of days ago:

    SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

    Comment


      #3
      I enjoyed seeing the eagle and two chicks were visible when Cathy took a look. I notice the eagle in Iowa is brown and white while the local eagles (see them just about every day) are black and white.

      They have many, many cameras at that site with lots of animals (including a rescue kitten cam) so I sent a link to the youngin (now part time in actual face to face school). She is enjoying them at school as she often finishes her work early.

      thanks
      *another random thought *

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks Agate for posting. Mama was just sitting when I looked and eaglets were not visible. I will keep watching at different intervals. Nuthatch was so good at keeping us in eagle videos. She would appreciate you carrying on.
        Virginia

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          #5
          ((((((Hugs to All)))))) ~

          Thank you, agate, for bringing back the Decorah Eagles! It has been too long since I have watched them. Jim and I used to love checking in on them every day.

          I just tuned in, and Mama was feeding the eaglets. Eagles are excellent parents and partners. The babies are so tiny and precious! They grow fast though.

          And, yes, I agree, Virginia. This thread is a nice way to remember Nuthatch.

          Let the bird watching begin!

          Love & Light,



          Rose

          *Virtual Hugs Are Germ-Free!



          THANKS!
          Mom to Jon, 49, & Michael, 32, born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Angel Jon received his wings in 2019. In 2020, Jim, their Dad, joined them.

          Comment


            #6
            I have yet to see the little ones. I think Mama is just keeping them warm and out of the wind. The winds are whipping up that high.
            Virginia

            Comment


              #7
              Mom or Dad has been feeding them just now. The two little tads don't care that it hasn't been cooked. I'm not sure what's on the menu. It might be better not to know too much about what they're eating or how it was obtained.
              SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

              Comment


                #8
                ((((((Hugs to All))))) ~

                agate ~

                As I recall, Mom and Dad usually serve the eaglets fish at this stage. The nest is located near a fishery, and that is the easiest prey to capture, with an abundance of fish to feed them forever.

                The nest is also located near a farm, so the menu will change in time to include small critters. This is the part that I didn't enjoy, when watching bird nests. I refer to it as "nature in your face."

                My neighbors are having a BBQ with friends in their backyard, and as soon as I smelled whatever meat they're cooking, I closed the windows and patio door. I grew up eating meat, and my dad BBQ'd every weekend. But, as a vegetarian, that smell is very unpleasant.

                Actually, I don't mind watching Mom and Dad feeding their eaglets. I just don't want to see what they are feeding them.

                Thank you again for connecting us with the Decorah Eagles.

                Love & Light,



                Rose

                *Virtual Hugs Are Germ-Free!


                THANKS!


                Mom to Jon, 49, & Michael, 32, born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Angel Jon received his wings in 2019. In 2020, Jim, their Dad, joined them.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I missed feeding time. But this must be play time. Mama has moved back just a tab and is letting them have what appears to be play time or maybe she is just resting her feet by standing on them rather than sitting on them.
                  Virginia

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I was able to watch her ripping apart what must have been most of a fish (trout?) and feed bits of it to each eaglet. When they weren't grabbing at the bits any more, she ate them herself. I was amazed at how much she must have fed them, considering their size.
                    SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Is Daddy smaller than Mama by any chance? They were both on the nest when I checked in, then big one got up in the tree for just a little while and then flew off. Smaller of the two is still in nest with babies, but standing back enough that they can flop around. One of them cried several times while I was watching. Sounded like a little squeak.
                      Virginia

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                        #12
                        ((((((Hugs to All)))))~

                        Yes, I think the Dad is usually smaller than the Mom, but I'm not sure.

                        As dusk fell upon the nest, I watched Mom digging in the nest to make a safe place for her babies, and her eaglets were squirming and ready to jump out of the nest. While nuzzling them with her beak to encourage them to take shelter beneath her, she kept a keen eye out for any prey, who might attempt to steal her babies.

                        Instinct. Just amazing to watch.

                        Here is a link to the Raptor Resource Project, with more information about the Decorah eagles (I hope it works):

                        Only registered and activated users can see links., Click Here To Register...

                        Love & Light,



                        Rose

                        *Virtual Hugs Are Germ-Free!



                        THANKS!
                        Mom to Jon, 49, & Michael, 32, born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Angel Jon received his wings in 2019. In 2020, Jim, their Dad, joined them.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I can't figure out if one eagle is smaller than the other but if you read some of the comments there, somebody might discuss their size. I looked through quite a few of them but didn't find it yet. Some interesting photos among the comments, like this one:
                          SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Agate, when I saw them moving around today and at one point they were up close to one another I could tell that one was smaller. Don't know if it is Mom or Dad who is smaller.
                            Virginia

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Eagles I've seen "in person" have been really huge. Somewhere on that Website it is stated that that nest is 49 square feet. I've seen live eagles only in zoos. These webcams are really great for getting a better look.
                              SPMS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate since December 2020.

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