BrainTalk Communities 10/2006-8/2011 Archives  

Go Back   BrainTalk Communities 10/2006-8/2011 Archives > General Subjects > Social Security Disability

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-24-2009, 06:40 PM
FacePain1 FacePain1 is offline
New Community Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 19
Default Describe what the disabled person does from the time he wakes up until going to bed.

This question the way it is phrased by SSDI process appears absurd.

Any suggestions by someone more creative than I on how to answer this? I suppose one could write ... eat breakfast, lunch, dinner, occasionally use the bathroom and have conversation with my spouse and children, look at USPS mail and check e-mail, pay bills, and speak weekly with out of town family on phone, do dishes.

Would appreciate knowing what others have stated in response to this question. Thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-24-2009, 06:59 PM
moose53 moose53 is offline
Distinguished Community Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,381
Default

FP,

There's absolutely nothing wrong with your response. But, if I were you (which I'm not ), I would expand on the answer by also stating what I USED TO DO and CAN NO LONGER DO. For me, when I filed (about 8 years ago), I cannot load the dishwasher without taking a break, since it hurts for me to stand. I can no longer load and unload the washer and dryer.

If you need help with some things, like transportation or housework, make sure you put a brief sentence in there about that too.

If you want to convince these people that you are no longer able to work for whatever reason, you have to demonstrate how your disability (whatever it is) impacts your day-to-day life.

Just my two cents. Good luck !!

Barb
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-24-2009, 08:14 PM
Daisygirl Daisygirl is offline
Distinguished Community Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 434
Default

Moose gave you excellent advice. It's very important that you stress to SSA how your particular disability has affected your everyday life.

Good Luck.
Daisygirl.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-24-2009, 08:28 PM
eyork eyork is offline
New Community Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 16
Default

If you need to lay down or take naps make sure that you note that. If you have to sit or lay down after a few minutes of ex... folding clothes, dishes, light cooking, fixing a bowl of cereal, eating or eating at the table, taking a bath make sure you note all this.

This was the hardest question for me also. I wish you the best of luck. If you have more questions, please post them. This is a great broad and they have been a lot of help for me. I was a reader for a long time.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-24-2009, 09:07 PM
knowsalittle knowsalittle is offline
Distinguished Community Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 138
Default

Yes, that question is poorly worked & nearly impossible to answer. BUT THIS FORM IS THE MOST IMPORTANT FORM THE APPLICANT WILL COMPLETE IN THE ENTIRE DISABILITY PROCESS!

Remember the whole disability determination revolves around how a medically diagnosed medical condition restricts the ability to function, specifically work function. Every applicant should take time to read and think out answers before writing the first word on the form. Write the answers on a separate sheet of paper or download a copy from an internet source such as http://www.disabilitydoc.com/storage...port-Adult.pdf and reread them to see if they make sense, to see if one answer contradicts another answer. If an answer will not go in the space allotted go to Section D or use additional sheets. (I have not found a form that can completed online has anyone else?) Go to http://www.socialsecurity.gov/OP_Hom.../416-0920a.htm for information on why this form is so important.

What the applicant should be trying to accomplish with this form is to show the specific area(s) in which function is restricted and how much function is restricted by the diagnosed medical impairment(s). If the applicant cannot show how high blood pressure, or needing glasses to drive, or…, or…, restricts the ability to function, that medical condition should not have been alleged in the first place as it is not a disabling conditon.

This form is not the place to make outlandish claims but neither is it the place to minimize functional limits. The applicant should be frank, factual, and unemotional in describing how, for example, pain or medication to relieve the pain affects the ability to perform the tasks listed on the form. The applicant should be careful stating s/he does things (mowing the lawn) that can be suggestive of normal function. If the applicant mows the yard qualifiers may be appropriate. (I mow the yard but only on a riding mower, or I mow the yard but I must stop and rest every X minutes.)

This leads to the question of sustainability. The applicant may be able to perform some activities occasionally but not be able to sustain the activity long enough to perform is as would be needed in a 40 hour work week. The applicant should take great care in explaining the issue of sustainability.

All answers that lead to function & sustainability should be thought out. The applicant whom says s/he does not cook should explain why s/he does not. (My spouse does this, or I cannot lift cooking utensils, or a gallon of milk, or…)

The disability examiner will carefully read every question and compare the answers to the medical evidence. If the medical evidence reasonably supports the alleged restriction then the statements will be considered credible and carry greater weight. If, on the other hand, the applicant reports s/he cannot walk 50’ but the treating doctor’s notes indicate the applicant just went deer hunting and carried a kill half a mile, the applicants statements will be seriously questioned.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-24-2009, 09:47 PM
Daisygirl Daisygirl is offline
Distinguished Community Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 434
Default

Hello again. Something else to be aware of, with this particular form, is that details are important. Stating that you cannot dress yourself, or bend over to tie your shoes, is not enough. You must explain why you cannot do these things, with reasons that link back to your alleged disability. You must always keep that in mind. SSA is not concerned about your illness, per se. They are only interested in how your particular illness/condition negatively impacts your ability to work, and live a normal life.

Best Regards.
Daisygirl.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-25-2009, 12:37 PM
Pookie Pookie is offline
Distinguished Community Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 400
Default

Excellent advise in this thread. There is nothing more for me to add.
__________________
"Don't urinate on my leg & tell me it's raining"....Judge Judy
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-25-2009, 09:50 PM
goddessoflubbock goddessoflubbock is offline
Distinguished Community Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: West Texas
Posts: 257
Default

It is all in how you approach it. Great stuff.

I remember years ago when I was applying for SSI for my son, they had questions like "can the child dress himself"?

Well yeah, physically he can put on clothes. However if left to himself he'd wear shorts in the snow and flannel shirts in the summer heat (actually he still does that). He can't pick occassion or weather-appropriate clothing.

I answered the hearing and sight questions the same way. He was approved right away.

As proud as we are oof what functions we have, getting SSDI is all about what we don't have anymore.
__________________
So Far:
Type II diabetes, asthma, anomia from chronic hypoxia, peripheral neuropathy, migraines, pulmonary hypertension, diastolic heart failure, bacterial endocarditis, sleep apnea, TMJ; DH and DS have ASD's, DD has ODD and bipolar. Yes, my house is a circus!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-30-2009, 11:30 PM
FacePain1 FacePain1 is offline
New Community Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 19
Default

Thank you all for your replies! The form was sent in today and thanks to your input, I was able to provide more thorough answers detailing my disability. Now I'll be getting a phone call tomorrow from a disability rep. so we'll see how that goes. It got off to a not so good start since she called today to ask how I was and I said ... "good how are you?". Probably not the best response to give to a disability rep. Of course I was just giving the standard response I give to many who ask this question even when I'm in the worst pain known to mankind but I suppose I should modify my answer a bit if it's the disability rep. She's going to call back tomorrow to talk with me. She said it'll take about 30-40 minutes.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-07-2009, 04:59 PM
cbramsey5318 cbramsey5318 is offline
Distinguished Community Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 106
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FacePain1 View Post
This question the way it is phrased by SSDI process appears absurd.

Any suggestions by someone more creative than I on how to answer this? I suppose one could write ... eat breakfast, lunch, dinner, occasionally use the bathroom and have conversation with my spouse and children, look at USPS mail and check e-mail, pay bills, and speak weekly with out of town family on phone, do dishes.

Would appreciate knowing what others have stated in response to this question. Thanks.
My lawyer told me the simpler the response to that question is the better. She would love your answer. I had waaaayyyyyy too much detail when I first answered this question.
__________________
I'm MultiTasking and I can't get up!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Don't know how to describe it resqgirl911 Depression 4 03-08-2009 05:06 PM
One word to describe... J&K Mom Child Neurology 19 04-08-2008 02:59 PM
A scholarly paper written by a disabled person about how disabled people are treated Richard Long Multiple Sclerosis 2 12-17-2007 09:28 PM
How to describe sensations? heatherj Peripheral Neuropathy 8 10-27-2007 03:25 PM
Pain in joints that wakes you up at night Smiling Angel Chronic Pain 13 10-15-2006 03:12 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:05 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
BrainTalk Communities Incorporated