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  #31  
Old 06-15-2009, 11:04 AM
Mom2Ava Mom2Ava is offline
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Thanks for posting all of this info. I am interested in much of it and plan on reading some of those articles at some point.
I hav e heard of several that have had great success w/ b6 for sz control. Our first ped neuro likes to try b6 before AEDs some of the time.

I am curious about something, if you have never taken an AED to control seizures, how do you know they have no effect on your seizures?
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  #32  
Old 06-16-2009, 04:25 PM
andy1618 andy1618 is offline
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Default Anti-epileptic drugs

Hi Mom2Ava,

"Doctors were mystified by my illness. None of the ‘normal’ antiepileptic drugs that were administered had any positive effects."

The above was taken from my story on page one. This happened between the ages of two weeks, when I had my first seizure, to five months, when doctor’s first administered vitamin B6. At this stage all anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) were removed.

When I was 15 years old I was put on another trial of AEDs. This was because we were told that a high dose of vitamin B6 may cause Peripheral Neuropathy. None of the AEDs had any positive effects on my seizures. Some of them even made my seizures worse and the side effects were terrible. During this approx. two year AED trial my B6 was reduced but of course had to be increased again to what it had been previously and all AEDs were slowly removed.

Therefore: I have never used any anti-epileptic Drugs to ‘control’ my seizures, only B vitamins.

“Anti-epileptic drugs have no positive effects on my seizures”. When I say this, I can only speak of those anti-epileptic drugs that I have tried.

All my major seizures (TCs, MCs, SPs, CPs,... etc.) were almost controlled with vitamin B6 only and had been for approx. 19 years .Then, after extensive research and with my doctors consent, I started to include a multi B complex tablet with my daily B6 tablet. The only seizures I have now are Absent 'TYPE' seizures.

**DO NOT ALTER ANY MEDICATION WITHOUT YOUR DOCTOR'S CONSENT**

Vitamins can interfere with some anti-epileptic drugs.

A high dose of vitamin B6 may cause Peripheral Neuropathy.

Regards

Andy
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  #33  
Old 06-16-2009, 09:31 PM
jcc jcc is offline
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Vitamin B6 can be toxic, but it is now believed many of the early reports were overstated. I don't think I posted this yet in this thread... but here is what the PDR says about the safety of B6

Quote:
"Doses of vitamin B6, typically in the form of pyridoxine, of up to 200 milligrams daily are generally well tolerated.

One report showed severe sensory neuropathy in seven adults after pyridoxine intakes that started at 50 to 100 milligrams/day and were steadily increased to 2 to 6 grams/day over 2 to 40 months. None of the subjects in the report showed sensory neuropathy at doses of pyridoxine of less than 2 grams/day. There is one report of a woman who had been taking 200 milligrams/day of pyridoxine for 2 years without showing sensory neuropathy who developed sensory neuropathy after she increased her pyridoxine dose to 500 milligrams/day. There are rare reports of sensory neuropathy occurring at pyridoxine doses in the range of 100 to 200 milligrams/day.

The Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences has concluded that reports and studies showing sensory neuropathy at doses of pyridoxine less than 200 milligrams/day are weak and inconsistent, with the weight of evidence indicating that sensory neuropathy is unlikely to occur in adults taking pyridoxine at doses less than 500 milligrams/day."
And, it is hypothesized that using the P5P active form of B6 may circumvent the potential for toxicity.

Quote:

From:
Vitamin B6 - Pyridoxine; Pyridoxal 5'-Phosphate
Alternative Medicine Review, Feb, 2001

Safety, Toxicity, and Side Effects

"The use of supplemental P5P has not been associated with toxicity, although the inactive form, pyridoxine, has been associated with reports of peripheral neuropathy.[45] One hypothesis is that pyridoxine toxicity is caused by exceeding the liver's ability to phosphorylate pyridoxine to P5P, yielding high serum levels of pyridoxine which may be directly neurotoxic or may compete with P5P for binding sites, resulting in a relative deficiency.[46]
Mpofu et al reported electrophysiological and neurological examination of 17 homocystinuric patients who had been treated with 200-500 mg pyridoxine HC1 daily for 10-24 years, and found no evidence of neuropathy.[47] Most reported cases of neuropathy associated with pyridoxine supplementation have involved intake of at least 500mg/day for two years or more.[48] While there is no doubt that vitamin B6 can be neurotoxic in gross excess, there is considerable controversy over the way in which toxicological data have been translated into advised limits.[8] "
Most people would not require above 100mg daily anyway, but there are some cases where higher doses are required, and in that case should probably be monitored by a doctor. Its always a good idea to take a B-complex along with it.

I'm happy to hear of a neurolgoist who actually tries B6 first, at least in suspect patients!
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  #34  
Old 07-31-2009, 05:11 AM
Homeopathy Homeopathy is offline
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Smile Homeopathic remedies for epilepsy

Homeopathic remedies for epilepsy and seizures:

http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/epile...tment-cure.asp
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  #35  
Old 09-11-2009, 08:01 AM
jasbone123 jasbone123 is offline
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Hi,
I read your thread.The body needs equal amounts of nutritions such as vitamins,proteins,carbohydreads,etc to live a healthy life.Something more or less will change your body equation.You should stop using medicines to improve vitamin level.
You have to intake healthy food,fruits and vegetables to increase your nutrition level.The use of medicines have high risk of addiction.So try to leave it alone.
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  #36  
Old 10-06-2009, 10:15 AM
andy1618 andy1618 is offline
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Hi,

Unfortunately stopping using a high dose of vitamin B6 is NOT an option for me. I need a high dose of vitamin B6 to control my extremely rare type of epilepsy.

I would like to point out that I am not vitamin B6 deficient. If I was, then 2 mg/day (100% EC RDA for men) would probably be suffice to rectify this problem. For the control of my extremely rare type of 'epileptic' seizures, I am DEPENDENT on a high dose of vitamin B6 (greater than 350 mg/day, 17500% EC RDA) . At present I consume 400 mg/day (20000% EC RDA) of Pyridoxine HCL (vitamin B6).

At 350 mg/day of Pyridoxine HCL my 'aura' returns. If my B6 is reduced further, my seizures start to return. The lower my B6, the worse my seizures become, until - with no extra B6, other than that which I consume from my balanced diet, I enter Status Epilepticus. From here I would probably become mentally impaired or worse. Never been there, never want to go there.

It would be impossible for me to consume the 400 mg/day that I need from my diet alone.

I will be forever grateful to the Professor, who was doing research into childhood epilepsy, for introducing me to a high dose of vitamin B6 when I was only five months old (20 mgs three times a day).

I know from my own experiences, and I am pleased to say, that research is continuing into vitamin B6 dependent/responsive seizures.
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  #37  
Old 10-17-2009, 05:58 AM
andy1618 andy1618 is offline
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http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Epilep...D=EP-nh3-02b22
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  #38  
Old 10-29-2009, 06:15 AM
andy1618 andy1618 is offline
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"B6 is one of the most versatile enzyme cofactors. It is involved in breaking more types of chemical bonds than most cofactors."

"Pyridoxine-dependent seizures and some types of sideroblastic anemias respond to vitamin B6 supplementation."

You may read the above quotes by clicking on 'Pyridoxal, pyridoxamine and
pyridoxine Vitamin B-6' at the following URL: http://intl-jn.nutrition.org/nutinfo/.
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  #39  
Old 11-03-2009, 09:40 PM
andy1618 andy1618 is offline
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" The seizures typically begin soon after birth and can be of multiple types, such as focal or bilateral motor seizures and myoclonic seizures. The seizures are refractory to standard AEDs but respond well to pyridoxine administration; occasionally, untreated patients have died of status epilepticus. Developmental disabilities are commonly found. Prolonged seizures as status epilepticus have been associated with pyridoxine dependency in infants (Yoshii et al 2005). Some patients present with intrauterine convulsions (Bejsovec et al 1967)."

" Late-onset seizures. Numerous “atypical” presentations of pyridoxine-dependent seizures have been described, mostly involving seizure onset beyond the neonatal period. Cases with seizure onsets up to 19 months of age have been observed (Goutieres and Aicardi 1985; Coker 1992). These late-onset cases are sometimes referred to as “post-neonatal pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy.” The seizure types in late-presenting cases are less predictable than in early-onset ones. Generalized tonic or clonic seizures are frequently described. Focal seizures with or without secondary generalization have been reported as well (Baxter 2001; Caraballo et al 2004). Epileptic spasms are rare but may occur. The late-onset form is more frequent than the classic neonatal form."

Taken from the following URL:

https://www.medlink.com/medlinkcontent.asp

**DO NOT ALTER ANY MEDICATION WITHOUT YOUR DOCTOR'S CONSENT**
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  #40  
Old 12-08-2009, 09:23 AM
andy1618 andy1618 is offline
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Default Vitamin B6

"Vitamin B6 plays numerous roles in the human
body. They include transamination of amino
acids, decarboxylation reactions, modulation of the
activity of steroid hormones, and regulation of gene
expression."

http://memo.cgu.edu.tw/cgmj/3005/300502.pdf
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