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  #11  
Old 02-05-2011, 11:39 AM
UTC12 UTC12 is offline
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When I go to the doctors, I am going to ask if there is a test that can be done to tell me if I am gluten sensitive. I just hope that my insurance pays for all of this testing.
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  #12  
Old 02-05-2011, 02:05 PM
Zonulin Zonulin is offline
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That is just nuts to do a biopsy first !!! Docs should always order the blood tests first, and proceed from there. I know an endoscopy costs more than a bloodtest (and also requires some risk on the part of the patient) -- perhaps your doctor(s) are more greedy than most. Check this out: http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/di...cdiagnosis.htm

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The first step in the diagnosis of celiac disease is usually a set of blood tests to measure levels of certain autoantibodies. Unlike antibodies, which attack foreign substances in the body, autoantibodies attack the body’s own tissues. The autoantibodies that doctors usually measure to test for celiac disease are called immunoglobulin A (IgA), anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTGA), and IgA anti-endomysium antibodies (AEA).

If the autoantibody levels turn out to be high, the patient probably has celiac disease. Unfortunately, however, if the levels are not elevated, it is not safe to conclude that the patient does not have celiac disease.

Biopsy for Celiac Disease Diagnosis
The next step, if the tests or symptoms suggest celiac disease, is a small bowel biopsy during an endoscopy. (“Small bowel” is another term for “small intestine.”) Small bowel biopsies are usually done to confirm the diagnosis, even when the blood tests are positive. If the patient has positive blood tests and biopsy-proven dermatitis herpetiformis, however, a small bowel biopsy is not required.

Ordinarily, the lining of the small intestine (the mucosa) is covered with hairlike projections called villi. In patients with untreated celiac disease, the inflammation that develops in response to gluten causes the villi to shrink and flatten. This effect can be seen when tissue samples taken from the small intestine by biopsy are examined under a microscope, as shown in Figure 1.

While the patient is asleep, the doctor passes a long, narrow tube called an endoscope through the patient’s mouth and stomach, into the small intestine. The doctor can then pass instruments through the endoscope to remove tissue samples and also to take photographs. Later, a pathologist will study the tissue samples to check for the classic signs of shrinkage and flattening of the villi.

Confirmation of a Celiac Disease Diagnosis: Improvement on the Gluten-Free Diet
The final piece that confirms the diagnosis of celiac disease –- after the positive biopsy result –- is improvement of health with the gluten-free diet.
Remember to make sure - when and if the blood tests are ordered - that they include the ANTIGLIADIN IGG ANTIBODY test -- make sure it is IgG, which many gastros are eliminating because it is not specific for celiac -- but it IS more specific for gluten sensitivity/intolerance. If you have celiac, you'll test positive on that test; and if you "only" have gluten sensitivity, you'll probably test positive on that test...(my son did, yet he was negative on all the celiac tests).

Karen
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  #13  
Old 02-07-2011, 08:42 PM
UTC12 UTC12 is offline
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Thank you for everyone input, my cousin just had ANOTHER colonoscopy done!! (His 3rd one in 6 months) The doctor said that he is going to have to stop drinking caffeinated drinks because when he was "looking" he still found some "waste" clinging to the walls of his colon. I think that I may have the same problem, because I can drink decaf coffee and feel fine right after, but when I drink regular coffee, it tears my stomach up. Although, it still does not explain why other foods affect me the way they do. I have been keeping a food log for the past 5 days and intend to keep one uptil the 21 and I have found that the only thing that I eaten that does not tear my stomach up is the gluten free waffles. Today, I had chicken enchiladas and my stomach is just ROLLING!!! and I didn't have any caffeine.
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  #14  
Old 02-08-2011, 12:12 AM
Zonulin Zonulin is offline
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When I go to the doctors, I am going to ask if there is a test that can be done to tell me if I am gluten sensitive. I just hope that my insurance pays for all of this testing.
An endoscopy is way more expensive than a blood test!!! Since your doctor insists on doing everything backwards, maybe you could arrange to know the costs of the blood test(s) upfront and then make "an informed decision" on whether to proceed. Sounds as though you have some definite issues with food -- did you know that most reactions to food are IgG (non-immediate) -- the IgE reactions are those which are immediate reactions to -- peanuts, shellfish, etc. in which the throat closes up/a rash covers the entire body, etc.? That's why you need to make sure the doctor orders the Antigliadin IgG Antibody test -- it will show the body's non-immediate reaction to gluten...otherwise, a simple skin prick test would show an "allergy" to wheat. 99% of people who have a problem with wheat show a reaction LATER (when it has time to be digested/leaky gut kicks in) -- the throat is not closing, there is no immediate rash. etc., therefore it is an IgG reaction.

My goodness - what are the doctors hoping to find in a multitude of colonoscopies performed on your cousin??? And why is the insurance company continuing to pay for these? I am truly amazed!! Suggest that your cousin request the Antigliadin IgG antibody test!!!

Karen
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  #15  
Old 02-08-2011, 08:24 AM
UTC12 UTC12 is offline
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I have no idea why they have not ordered a blood test. He is so tired of this he said that he will do ANYTHING to find out what is wrong with him. I am going to tell him, that he needs to have a blood test done and to test for IgG antibodies.
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  #16  
Old 02-08-2011, 04:40 PM
Zonulin Zonulin is offline
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Let's hope that will provide some insight for him...and for you, too! Doctors are supposed to run tests to diagnose their patients -- Make sure it is the Antigliadin IgG Antibody test

Anti = against;
gliadin = protein in wheat;
IgG = non-immediate;
Antibody = what we make to protect ourselves against "invaders".

FYI - gluten is the term used to describe the difficult-to-digest proteins of barley, wheat and rye:
Wheat protein = gliadin
Barley protein = secalin
Rye protein = hordein

Gliadin is so difficult to decimate with laboratory chemicals that it is universally used for these types of tests - we'll probably never see a test for "Antisecalin" or "Antihordein" antibodies!

Notice that the word "protein" ends in "IN" -- and notice that all these grain proteins also end in "IN."

That's the science lesson for today... Might make it easier to explain to the doctor what you want to know, which is, "Am I producing Antigliadin IgG antibodies?"

Karen
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  #17  
Old 03-10-2011, 10:03 PM
Huddleston Huddleston is offline
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Thumbs up Diarrhea following gallbladder removal

Ask your doctor to prescribe powdered cho*****ramine. It works for me. I had the same problem after my gallbladder was removed. I don't know whether it has anything to do with my celiac disease or not. I am religiously gluten free. Cho*****ramine is the generic name and Questran is the brand name. Do not accept the pill form, as it does not work for this problem. We mix it with Chrystal Lite and it does not taste bad at all. The nice side affect is that it lowers your cholesterol as well. Cho*****ramine is an old cholesterol lowering medication. It binds with the bile (which is where the cholesterol is) and then it is eliminated from the body without entering the bloodstream. You might even have to have your pharmacist locate where the power can be found, as most pharmacies only carry the pills. I repeat, the pills don't work for me.
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  #18  
Old 03-11-2011, 04:58 PM
UTC12 UTC12 is offline
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That is exactly what he prescribed me. I was using just one packet a day, but I went back and said that my BM's were still soft, without bile. I bumped it up to 2 packets a day and WOOHOO, it WORKS!!!! They also prescribed a SMALL amount of some kind of muscle relaxer to relax my colon, to get rid of the urgency. I find that it works, but when I take it like they say, once before every meal, that I get HORRIBLE gas. Now I only take one a day. Also, I asked about taking the pill form because my keppra interferes with the chlorestomine. I have to take the chlorestormine after I get back from classes and that is around noon. Just guess I will have to deal with taking it at noon.
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  #19  
Old 03-13-2011, 08:47 AM
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Default Maybe---hcl?

Go to page 8 ( this forum ) and click on IF IT LOOKS LIKE A DUCK...IS IT? Then go to thread #201 by Christh.
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  #20  
Old 03-13-2011, 08:58 AM
can can is offline
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ALSO----bloating is a sign that there could not be enough HCL
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