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  #1  
Old 10-25-2009, 05:51 PM
can can is offline
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Smile 10 month old baby

A really good friend of the family just had a baby girl 10 months ago and she is breast fed. I suspect that the mother has gluten sensitivity because of gasto problems, dental enamel problems, skin problems, and asthma. The mother still eats gluten ( has not been tested yet ) and has noticed blood streaks in the baby's stool almost from the begining. They just did a celiac blood test on the baby. I was wondering if anybody out there would know if it is too early to do a celiac blood test on a 10 month old? I would suspect so, but of course, I am no expert. Thanks in advance for any tips.
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  #2  
Old 10-25-2009, 10:16 PM
GFPaperdoll GFPaperdoll is offline
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Default Testing 10 Month Old

Hi Can, my granddaughter that is now 11 YO has two DQ1 genes, she is NOT gluten free. She has asthma & other breathing problems, hives, rashes, overweight, & has lost all the enamel on all her teeth. She is constantly ill with colds, flu, ear infections, stomach upsets...

It certainly sounds like this mom could have a gluten problem & the baby as well. I would hope that the pedi has checked the blood in the baby's stool...

I hold slim to none hope that the baby's blood work will be positive for gluten. A few of those reasons would be: Did they order all the tests? Does the lab know how to process the tests? Did the baby eat enough gluten to actually get some antibodies that will show up? Probably not.

I believe that the real true test is to try the gluten free diet. If things get better then you have your answer. They could also get the gene test thru enterolab.com, which will test for all the genes, not just DQ2 & DQ8.
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  #3  
Old 10-25-2009, 11:26 PM
jcc jcc is offline
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The blood work is especially iffy in children under 2. The antigliadin IgA might be a better test in this age group, but if it is negative... the best test might be a gluten diet trial for mother and baby.

Quote:
Antigliadin immunoglobulin A best in finding celiac disease in children younger than 18 months of age.
Quote:

Lagerqvist C, Dahlbom I, Hansson T, Jidell E, Juto P, Olcén P, Stenlund H, Hernell O, Ivarsson A.
Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Ume* University, Ume*, Sweden. carina.lagerqvist@pediatri.umu.se
OBJECTIVES: The aim was to investigate age-dependent serum levels and occurrence of elevated celiac disease (CD)-related antibodies in young children, to define the optimal serological procedure when selecting for small intestinal biopsy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Included were 428 children with biopsy verified CD (median age 16 months; range 7.5 months-14 years) and 216 controls (median age 2.7 years; range 8.5 months-14.6 years). Immunoglobulin (Ig) A antibodies against gliadin (AGA-IgA), tissue transglutaminase (tTG-IgA), and endomysium (EMA-IgA) were analysed. RESULTS: Increased serum AGA-IgA levels were found in 411 of 428 CD cases, tTG-IgA in 385 of 428, and EMA-IgA in 383 of 428. In the control group, 11 of 216 had increased levels of AGA-IgA, 5 of 216 of tTG-IgA, and 8 of 216 of EMA-IgA. In CD children younger than 18 months, elevated AGA-IgA occurred in 97% and elevated tTG-IgA and EMA-IgA were found in 83% of the cases. Conversely, in CD children older than 18 months, elevated AGA-IgA occurred in 94%, and elevated tTG-IgA and EMA-IgA were found in 99% of the cases. CONCLUSIONS: In children older than 18 months, both tTG-IgA and EMA-IgA are sufficiently accurate to be used as a single antibody marker, whereas a large proportion of younger children with CD lack these antibodies. Therefore, when selecting children for small intestinal biopsy, the detection of a combination of AGA-IgA and tTG-IgA is optimal for identifying untreated CD in children younger than 18 months.
PMID: 18852634
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  #4  
Old 10-27-2009, 01:00 PM
can can is offline
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Smile Great Info

Thanks GFPaperdoll and Cara. As far as I am concerned, THE GOLD STANDARD should be " A GLUTEN-FREE DIET." The Mom and my daughter and son, think I am from Mars when I tell them to eliminate gluten.
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  #5  
Old 10-27-2009, 08:07 PM
jcc jcc is offline
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You aren't alone...
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  #6  
Old 10-28-2009, 02:05 AM
Zonulin Zonulin is offline
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If the mom really really wants her baby to suffer from colic, projectile vomiting, projectile diarrhea, stools that look like chocolate pudding as well as a baby who can NEVER SLEEP, then gluten while nursing is definitely the way to go Also if she enjoys trips to the Emergency Room, nursing while eating gluten is the way to go because her baby will eventually become completely dehydrated, will have blood with the "stools" and will come perilously close to dying again and again and again. No pediatrician will GET THIS. It happened to us.

Karen
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Old 10-28-2009, 11:45 AM
Razzle0 Razzle0 is offline
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Milk protein intolerance can also cause blood streaks in a nursing infant... But yes, gluten is a likely culprit given the mother's symptoms...

Take care,

-Razzle
Gluten Sensitivity, GF since 7/05
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  #8  
Old 11-28-2009, 07:21 PM
can can is offline
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Smile Update

Of course, the blood test came back negative for the baby. Mom gave the baby more gluten ( Dr. was telling her it might be dairy etc. instead ) and low and behold, more blood in the stool. Mom now says she will go to Enterolab. The saga continues.
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Old 11-30-2009, 04:50 PM
Zonulin Zonulin is offline
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"Blood in stool" was what Ted had as an infant - the first time it happened, we were told to run don't walk to the ER, where they ran some horrible and invasive tests on our baby boy. The "diagnosis"? "Must be some kinda virus." I just checked out this fantastic book from our Community Health Education Center at our hospital (yup - the same hospital where "viruses which cause bloody stools" run amok) called Healthier Without Wheat by Dr. Stephen Wangen (published in 2009), and he has an entire chapter about "Infants, Children, and Gluten Intolerance." Here's what he says:

Quote:
Infants, even those who are only breast-feeding, can suffer from a gluten intolerance. Some of their symptoms are different from those of adults. And of course, they can't communicate their discomfort to us verbally. Here are some of the more common symptoms seen in infants:

Crying more than average
Colic
Poor sleep
Very foul stools
Constipation
Bad gas
Spitting up or burping a lot (ummm - that would be projectile vomiting for us)
Eczema
Failure to thrive
Just plain orneriness

Breast-feeding infants can be subject to a gluten problem in two different ways. First, they may be born with a gluten intolerance. When they ingest components of gluten from their mothers' breast milk, they react to it like any other gluten intolerant person. Their immune system detects the gluten and forms an immune reaction against it, producing gliadin antibodies as discussed in detail earlier in this book.

The second way is unique to infants...if the mother has a gluten intolerance and continues to eat gluten, then she is making antibodies against gluten, which she passes on to her infant in her breast milk. These antibodies can then trigger in the infant an inflammatory immune response against gluten. In this case, the infant may not have been born with a gluten intolerance, but its immune system is obliged to respond to the antibodies in the breast milk. Antibodies are essentially flags. A problem - in this case gluten - is being flagged. Therefore, the infant's immune system will respond, even though the infant did not produce the antibodies.

For this reason, when treating breast-feeding infants it is very important to evaluate the mother for gluten intolerance (as well as for an intolerance or allergy to other foods). If she is gluten intolerant, then removing gluten from her diet is an important part of treating the infant. However, even if she is not gluten intolerant, if the infant is gluten intolerant the mother still needs to avoid gluten during the period that she is breast-feeding her infant.

...When testing for any antibodies in breast-fed infants, it is important to be aware of the possibility that the antibodfies may no actually belong to the infant. They may be coming from the mother's breast milk. ...This is why the mother should be tested as well. ...Testing should focus on the mother, and if it shows that she is positive for gluten intolerance, then she should of course remove gluten from her diet. She can also do a trial elimination of gluten from her diet. If this satisfactorily improves the health of the infant, then the goal has been achieved, at least temporarily.
Dr. Wangen suggests what this forum has suggested all along: Antigliadin IgG antibody and Antigliadin IgA antibody blood tests PLUS the total IgA (many people - my son included - are IgA Deficient, and you will need to know their total IgA (thru an Immunoglobulin Panel Test) to see whether the Antigliadin IgA test might be skewed (will test LOWER and thus be dismissed by the doctor).

This is a great book - I am going nuts with the Post-It notes...

Karen
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  #10  
Old 12-03-2009, 01:24 AM
can can is offline
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Smile Great Info--karen-(-again! )

I will pass this info along. Thank you. As per Enterolab, it is best to test after 18-24 months old.
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