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Old 11-19-2009, 10:36 PM
Seeker Seeker is offline
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Default signs of gluten sensitivity?

I recalled today that a doctor once told me that a sign of gluten sensitivity is if you eat a bagel or a lot of gluten and have loose stools afterwords, this can be a sign of gluten intolerance or insensitivity. Does this sound right? If you have to consume a certain threshold amount of gluten before getting this or any other symptom, would this suggest that people who have GS have different thresholds for gluten?

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Old 11-20-2009, 01:01 AM
Zonulin Zonulin is offline
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I recalled today that a doctor once told me that a sign of gluten sensitivity is if you eat a bagel or a lot of gluten and have loose stools afterwords, this can be a sign of gluten intolerance or insensitivity. Does this sound right? - Seeker
That would certainly be a sign that the ingredients in the bagel irritated the digestive tract! That's sort of a wake-up call that is difficult to ignore. More insidious would be the down-the-road immune response to that bagel - the arthritis, the fibromyalgia, the bowel cancer, the lupus, the Multiple Sclerosis, etc. etc. etc.

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If you have to consume a certain threshold amount of gluten before getting this or any other symptom, would this suggest that people who have GS have different thresholds for gluten? - Seeker
If I've learned anything from researching this for (gasp) years, it's that we are just like snowflakes, and no two people are alike. You may be genetically predisposed to have brown eyes, love chocolate, and have an immediate and disturbing reaction to even a crumb of gluten. Or you may have green eyes, an affinity for tulips, and not have any digestive reaction to gluten but not be able to carry a child to full-term (miscarriage is common when a fetus cannot get the nutrients it needs to survive).

Whether you can eat a bushel of bagels in one sitting with seemingly no "ill effects" or whether a crumb results in some quality time on the throne will depend on YOU, your genetics, your environment. We know about the gliadin protein's effect on the gut (that it produces Zonulin, which causes more space between the cells, which allows these proteins to move throughout the body, perhaps triggering an immune response to the foreign protein(s)). Knowing how people in my family have suffered from various autoimmune disorders as well as gastro cancers is enough to make the idea of eating gluten...distasteful.

Cara? Can?

Karen
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Old 11-20-2009, 06:22 PM
Naominjw Naominjw is offline
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Originally Posted by Seeker View Post
I recalled today that a doctor once told me that a sign of gluten sensitivity is if you eat a bagel or a lot of gluten and have loose stools afterwords, this can be a sign of gluten intolerance or insensitivity. Does this sound right? If you have to consume a certain threshold amount of gluten before getting this or any other symptom, would this suggest that people who have GS have different thresholds for gluten?

Seeker
No. It is NOT necessarily true. I personally have always had loose stools. But my daughter who had rather severe intestinal malabsorption never had loose stools from it. She had somewhat of an opposite problem, as did her sister. And eating more gluten didn't seem any different than any other time, probably because their system was saturated.

Also, a person can be reacting 5 up to five days later. I had a problem with one food additive that was so hard to figure out... ummm... well... the gluten was, too, and I didn't figure that out until both my daughters were found to not tolerate it.

For me, I had chronic hives. But my daughters did not.

I know there is some matter of degree, but more important is that the symptoms can vary from person to person. I have also read that a person can have it and be malabsorbing - have Celiac and not even know it.

Even a small amount causes us to react. I had it in a food supplement I thought - hey - it is such a minute amount. Stupid me.
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Old 11-20-2009, 10:46 PM
jcc jcc is offline
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In the landmark prevalence study on celiac disease, investigators determined that 60% of children and 41% of adults diagnosed during the study were asymptomatic (without any symptoms).
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Only 35% of newly diagnosed patients had chronic diarrhea, dispelling the myth that diarrhea must be present to diagnose celiac disease.
http://www.uchicagokidshospital.org/pdf/uch_007937.pdf

There are symptoms, like diarrhea, that are commonly associated with celiac disease... but there is no single symptom that all people get. It really does vary by the person. Some people can be super reactive to the slightest trace, and others eat a bagel and not have any noticeable reaction at all. And, it doesn't so much matter whether they have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity... it can vary either way...either way!

One daughter with gluten sensitivity had diarrhea, gas and bloating, daily stomachaches, episodic vomiting, skin rashes, and neurological symptoms.

My other daughter had constipation, stomach aches, joint pain, back aches, dental enamel defect, mood problems, rashes and hives.

And although the references above apply to celiac disease, pretty much anything that applies to celiac disease also applies to gluten sensitivity, except villous atrophy.
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Old 11-21-2009, 12:38 AM
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Smile So True

I like the "SNOWFLAKE" ANALOGY. I could eat tons of gluten in one sitting ( like half a chocolate cake--a whole large pizza--half a loaf of bread ) without any symptoms, but over time, things sure changed. As you become more unable to properly digest vitamins and minerals, more and more food sensitivities " POP OUT OF THE WOODWORK." As my daughter said just after getting her positive gluten sensitivity results back from Enterolab, But Dad, I eat all kinds of wheat with no symptoms at all." IGNORANCE IS BLISS---but only for a little while.
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Old 11-21-2009, 01:33 PM
jcc jcc is offline
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And my older daughter said, Mom, I tried a gfd and it didn't make any difference at all. Well, she only stuck with it in earnest for less than two months, and when she secretly started eating gluten.... her lymph nodes in her neck swelled to the size of peanut M&M's with no other sign of illness.
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Old 11-23-2009, 10:19 AM
Naominjw Naominjw is offline
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Hmmm... I thought of something... A woman I know seemed to have gluten sensitivity, yet found she could eat some sporadically without symptoms. That seemed to make no sense.

Her symptoms were mysterious - swelling in her hands, and falling down. The doctors thought it was her heart but it wasn't. She developed sporadic hallucinations. When she found that stopping gluten got rid of the symptoms she was thrilled. But she could eat SOME. Huh???

Finally, she ended up in the ER who sent her on to another private doctor. And what they found was she had a severe Candida. They figure that her body's reaction to the candida was making her intolerant to gluten, dairy and some other things. It wasn't a "true" gluten sensitivity?

In any case, as bizarre as this sounds, she was extensively treated for the candida / fungus? and she now eats gluten.

Personally, I think she'd be better off with a major diet change to keep healthy.... but... that is just my un-asked-for opinion....
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Old 11-23-2009, 10:47 AM
jcc jcc is offline
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It is a confusing situation sometimes. While I do believe that probably nobody should eat gluten (or cow's milk) just because it can cause so many problems for so many, I've always rather believed that some cases of gluten sensitivity are secondary to something else...and in this case, I suppose, the gluten proliferated the candida growth and the candida overgrowth was the real culprit. Candida feeds on gluten, casein, and sugar.... somthing those with yeast overgrowth have to give up at least temporarilyl in order to eradicate the yeast, often along with anti-fungals.

There are other cases where a leaky gut might be due to some other condition, and once that is identified and fixed up, perhaps the person can eat gluten and casein again. Of course, I am NOT talking about those with celiac disease, but perhaps a small subset of those with gluten sensitivity.

I recently heard a naturapathic doctor, also trained in Chinese medicine, who doesn't believe in food sensitivity... believes he can fix it all by re-establishing a good gut environment and builing up the immune system. I think that is important, but I don't believe that can fix all gluten sensitivity.

But, I'm pretty sure not all gluten sensitivity is the exactly the same thing.
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