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  #11  
Old 10-25-2006, 10:30 PM
halsgluten halsgluten is offline
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"Evidence for ... >serotonin dysregulation<, ... continue to accumulate."

See associations with ADHD, Bipolar, and Schizophrenia. symptoms.

Hal
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  #12  
Old 10-27-2006, 06:13 PM
annelb annelb is offline
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We all know there is a significant number of people with DM type 1 who also have CD. We know that all children with T1DM should be screened for CD. What is interesting is that this abstract says they found an incidence of 12.3%. That is higher than found in other studies. I need to check out articles looking for CD in adults. Most of the articles about CD and DM are about children.

What is the incidence of children with T1DM who have elevated Zonulin levels.
Anne

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...=pubmed_docsum


Quote:
Diabetes Care. 2006 Nov;29(11):2452-6. Links
Clinical Benefit of a Gluten-Free Diet in Type 1 Diabetic Children With Screening-Detected Celiac Disease: A population-based screening study with 2 years' follow-up.

* Hansen D,
* Brock-Jacobsen B,
* Lund E,
* Bjorn C,
* Hansen LP,
* Nielsen C,
* Fenger C,
* Lillevang ST,
* Husby S.

Department of Pediatrics, Odense University Hospital, Sdr. Boulevard 29, 5000 Odense C, Denmark. dorte.hansen@dadlnet.dk.

OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to 1) determine the prevalence of celiac disease in Danish children with type 1 diabetes and 2) estimate the clinical effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) in patients with diabetes and celiac disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In a region comprising 24% of the Danish population, all patients <16 years old with type 1 diabetes were identified and 269 (89%) were included in the study. The diagnosis of celiac disease was suspected in patients with endomysium and tissue transglutaminase antibodies in serum and confirmed by intestinal biopsy. Patients with celiac disease were followed for 2 years while consuming a GFD. RESULTS: In 28 of 33 patients with celiac antibodies, an intestinal biopsy showed villous atrophy. In 5 patients, celiac disease had been diagnosed previously, giving an overall prevalence of 12.3% (95% CI 8.6-16.9). Patients with celiac disease had a lower SD score (SDS) for height (P < 0.001) and weight (P = 0.002) than patients without celiac disease and were significantly younger at diabetes onset (P = 0.041). A GFD was obtained in 31 of 33 patients. After 2 years of follow-up, there was an increase in weight SDS (P = 0.006) and in children <14 years old an increase in height SDS (P = 0.036). An increase in hemoglobin (P = 0.002) and serum ferritin (P = 0.020) was found, whereas HbA(1c) remained unchanged (P = 0.311) during follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: This population-based study showed the highest reported prevalence of celiac disease in type 1 diabetes in Europe. Patients with celiac disease showed clinical improvements with a GFD. We recommend screening for celiac disease in all children with type 1 diabetes.

PMID: 17065683 [PubMed - in process]
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  #13  
Old 11-03-2006, 02:48 PM
jcc jcc is offline
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Default Depression;Bipolar

So...this is October, but I'm not sure its been posted.

Coeliac disease and risk of mood disorders - A general population-based cohort study.
PMID: 17030405 Oct 2006

Quote:
BACKGROUND: Earlier research has indicated a positive association between coeliac disease (CD) and some mental disorders. Studies on CD and depression have inconsistent findings and we know of no study of CD and the risk of bipolar disorder (BD). METHODS: We used Cox regression to investigate the risk of subsequent mood disorders (MD); depression and BD in 13,776 individuals with CD and 66,815 age- and sex-matched reference individuals in a general population-based cohort study in Sweden. We also studied the association between prior MD and CD through conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: CD was associated with an increased risk of subsequent depression (Hazard ratio (HR)=1.8; 95% CI=1.6-2.2; p<0.001, based on 181 positive events in individuals with CD and 529 positive events in reference individuals). CD was not associated with subsequent BD (HR=1.1; 95% CI=0.7-1.7; p=0.779, based on 22 and 99 positive events). Individuals with prior depression (OR=2.3; 95% CI=2.0-2.8; p<0.001) or prior BD (OR=1.7; 95% CI=1.2-2.3; p=0.001) were at increased risk of a subsequent diagnosis of CD. LIMITATIONS: Study participants with CD and MD may have more severe disease than the average patient with these disorders since they were identified through a hospital-based register. CONCLUSIONS: CD is positively associated with subsequent depression. The risk increase for CD in individuals with prior depression and BD may be due to screening for CD among those with MD.
PMID: 17030405
This one from Dec 2005, but I think I must have been Christmas shopping and let is slip past. Least it wasn't in TGF.


[Diagnosis of coeliac disease in patients with isolated neuropsychological symptoms. Cases reports]
PMID: 16922014 Dec 2005
Quote:

INTRODUCTION: After first report of Cooke e Smith, numerous are the reports of Coeliac Disease (CD) and neuropsychological symptoms association. The neuropsychological symptoms may precede or follow the diagnosis of CD, representing sometimes the only clinic manifestations (atypical forms). It's seem that frequency of unknown CD in patients with neuropsychological symptoms is about 16% and in a recent study about 7% of new cases of CD was diagnosed in order of neuropsychological disorders. To explain this clinical association various are the hypothesis proposed. CASE REPORTS: We report n degrees 4 cases (middle age 11 years and 2 months) come to our clinic for neuropsychological symptoms; all had diagnosis of CD (by serologic screening and intestinal biopsy); nobody had nutritional deficit, sideropenic anaemia or thyroid deficits. In all patients the introduction of dietetic therapy resolved the symptoms. CONCLUSION: These cases represent atypical forms of CD manifested in childhood only by neuropsychological disorders. To make an early diagnosis and to improve the disease prognosis, the literature and our clinic experience shown that is useful screen the CD in all patients with neuropsychological disorders such as epileptics foci in the parietal-occipital region and/or occipital calcification, headache (mostly if there isn't familiarity), spinocerebellar ataxia, neuromuscular disease of unknown aetiology, Down syndrome, behavioural disorders and some psychiatric troubles.
PMID: 16922014
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Last edited by jcc; 11-03-2006 at 03:06 PM.
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  #14  
Old 11-12-2006, 12:42 PM
jcc jcc is offline
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Frequency and prognostic value of IgA and IgG endomysial antibodies in recurrent aphthous stomatitis. PMID: 16874419 2006

Quote:
Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common disease of the oral mucous membranes. Currently a hypothesis is being discussed that it might be pathogenetically related to coeliac disease. We evaluated the frequency of coeliac disease anti-endomysial (or anti-transglutaminase) antibodies in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Blood samples from 42 patients were evaluated and 2/42 (4.7%) were IgA- and IgG-endomysial antibody-positive. None of the 42 persons in the control group had antibodies, which was not statistically different from the patient group. The two antibody-positive patients had episodes of mild gastrointestinal symptoms only, but histopathology of duodenal mucous membranes confirmed coeliac disease. All symptoms related to aphthous stomatitis responded well to a gluten-free diet. We conclude that every patient with recurrent aphthous stomatitis should be asked about a history of gastrointestinal complaints and screened for markers of coeliac disease, since recurrent aphthous stomatitis may in some cases respond to a gluten-free diet.
PMID: 16874419
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  #15  
Old 11-14-2006, 11:38 AM
annelb annelb is offline
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This isn't much information. Will have to get the complete article. Quality of life issues was discussed at the International Celaic Symposium. One interesting chart showed that men with CD perceived they had a better quality of live when compared to women with CD.
Anne

Quote:
Postgrad Med J. 2006 Nov;82(973):705-712. Links
Complications of coeliac disease: are all patients at risk?

* Goddard CJ,
* Gillett HR.

St John's Hospital, Howden Road West, Livingston, West Lothian EH54 6PP, UK. helen.gillett@wlt.scot.nhs.co.uk.

Coeliac disease is a common condition that is increasingly being recognised as a result of the development of sensitive and specific serology. The diagnosis of coeliac disease and its subsequent treatment with a gluten-free diet have implications for the patient, not just for symptom control but also for the possible effect on quality of life and risk of complications. Whether the mode of presentation of coeliac disease has an effect on survival or risk of complication is yet unclear. This article reviews the available evidence regarding these issues.

PMID: 17099088 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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  #16  
Old 11-17-2006, 12:12 AM
annelb annelb is offline
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In order to determine the incidence of CD in a population, it must be tested. Until Dr. Fasano came to the US from Italy, the US had an incidence of 1:5000(or was it 50,000). The more they test, the more they find.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...=pubmed_docsum

Quote:
1: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006 Dec;41(12):1414-20.Click here to read Links
Population screening for coeliac disease in a low prevalence area in Italy.

* Menardo G,
* Brizzolara R,
* Bonassi S,
* Marchetti A,
* Dante GL,
* Pistone C,
* Marenco D,
* Rabellino V,
* Buscaglia S,
* Scarso R,
* Murialdo M,
* Venturino E,
* Marino CE,
* Descalzi D,
* Minetti F,
* Bagnasco M,
* Pesce G.

Medicina Interna II ASL2 Savona, Ospedale S.Paolo, Savona, Italy.

Objective. A screening program was proposed for the village of Carcare (population 5700), located in a region of Italy with an apparently low prevalence of coeliac disease (CD): only 1 patient diagnosed out of 2557 inhabitants. The study group comprised 1002 individuals (568 F, 434 M, age range 13-90 years) recruited from blood donors, secondary school pupils and people referred to the local outpatient facilities for routine blood chemistry. Material and methods. Total IgA, IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) (ELISA, recombinant human antigen) and IgA antiendomysium (EMA) (IFI, umbilical cord substrate) antibodies were measured in the serum of all participants. All patients with IgA deficiency were investigated for IgG tTG antibodies, and in the case of disagreement between tTG and EMA, they were typed for HLA DQ2-DQ8 haplotypes. Results. Thirteen subjects were positive and 988 negative for autoantibodies (3/988 had IgA deficiency). One serum sample was positive for tTG antibodies but negative for EMA. Ten out of 13 positive subjects consented to undergo duodenal biopsy, which invariably produced evidence of CD despite the absence of clinical signs/symptoms. A post-diagnostic clinical investigation provided evidence showing mild iron deficiency (4 subjects) and osteoporosis (2 subjects). After counselling, all subjects accepted a gluten-free diet. Conclusions. The prevalence of CD in the study group was 1:100 (1.0%; 95% CI: 0.5-1.8%): this indicates that CD is largely underdiagnosed in Carcare. Our results suggest that the low prevalence of CD observed in some regions is likely to be due to underdiagnosis.

PMID: 17101572 [PubMed - in process]
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  #17  
Old 12-01-2006, 08:55 PM
jcc jcc is offline
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Default On genetics

Can't really interpret this ...but thought someone might be interested.

Genome-wide linkage analysis of 160 North American families with celiac disease.
PMID: 17136122 Nov 2006

Quote:
Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune disease caused by exposure to the protein gliadin in wheat, and related prolamins in barley and rye. The prevalence of the disease in the US is 1:133. The aim of this study was to identify non-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci that predispose to CD. A genome-wide search of 405 microsatellite markers was performed on DNA samples from 160 families with a minimum of two cases of CD. Multipoint, parametric and non-parametric linkage (NPL) analyses were performed. Locations on chromosomes 1q, 3q, 6p, 6q, 7q, 9q and 10q showed linkage statistics (NPL scores or heterogeneity logarithm of the odds (HLOD) scores) of approximately 2.0 or larger. The greatest evidence for linkage outside of chromosome 6 was on 7q and 9q. An NPL score of 2.60 occurred at position 151.0 on 7q and a HLOD score of 2.47 occurred at position 144.8 on 9q under a recessive model. As expected, there was highly significant linkage to the HLA region on 6p, with NPL and HLOD scores exceeding 5.50. In conclusion, this genome-wide linkage analysis represents one of the largest such studies of CD. The most promising region is a putative locus on 7q, a region reported independently in previous genome-wide searches.Genes and Immunity advance online publication, 30 November 2006; doi:10.1038/sj.gene.6364361.
PMID: 17136122
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  #18  
Old 12-03-2006, 01:43 PM
annelb annelb is offline
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Cara, I did not understand that abstract either.

This one is not about CD but since people with IBD often have gluten intolerance I decided to post it here. My message is get your vitamin D level checked. Winter is here and you need a good store to get you through the cold months.

This study used <15ng/ml as the low and found 34.6% were deficient. I wonder what percent would have been deficient if a cutoff of 30ng/ml was used. Some researchers think that the cutoff should be 30 and some think that 50-60ng/ml should be the optimal.
Anne

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...=pubmed_docsum

Quote:
Pediatrics. 2006 Nov;118(5):1950-61. Links
Vitamin D status in children and young adults with inflammatory bowel disease.Pappa HM, Gordon CM, Saslowsky TM, Zholudev A, Horr B, Shih MC, Grand RJ.
Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Children's Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA. helen.pappa@childrens.harvard.edu

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies of vitamin D status in pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease have revealed conflicting results. We sought to report (1) the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentration < or = 15 ng/mL) in a large population with inflammatory bowel disease, (2) factors predisposing to this problem, and (3) its relationship to bone health and serum parathyroid hormone concentration. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 130 patients (8-22 years of age) with inflammatory bowel disease, 94 with Crohn disease and 36 with ulcerative colitis, had serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D, intact parathyroid hormone, and lumbar spine bone mineral density (using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) measured at Children's Hospital Boston. RESULTS: The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was 34.6%. Mean serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentration was similar in patients with Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, 52.6% lower among patients with dark skin complexion, 33.4% lower during the winter months (December 22 to March 21), and 31.5% higher among patients who were taking vitamin D supplements. Serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentration was positively correlated with weight and BMI z score, disease duration, and serum albumin concentration and negatively correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Patients with Crohn disease and upper gastrointestinal tract involvement were more likely to be vitamin D deficient than those without it. Serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin concentration was not associated with lumbar spine bone mineral density z score or serum parathyroid hormone concentration. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent among pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Factors predisposing to the problem include having a dark-skin complexion, winter season, lack of vitamin D supplementation, early stage of disease, more severe disease, and upper gastrointestinal tract involvement in patients with Crohn disease. The long-term significance of hypovitaminosis D for this population is unknown at present and merits additional study.

PMID: 17079566 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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