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Old 01-11-2010, 12:46 PM
can can is offline
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Smile Gluten & Lyme = Toxic Taste!!

And if a gluten-free diet may not be working then-------go to www.canlyme.com ( Canadian Lyme Disease Foundation ). It states in part------The infection rate when Lyme in the tick population is exploding in North America and as the Earth's temperature warms, this trend is expected to continue. Many Lyme patients WERE FIRSTLY DIAGNOSED WITH other illnesses such as Juvenile Arthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Reactive Arthritis, Infectious Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, Fibromyalgia, Raynaud's Syn., Chronic Fatigue Syn., Interstitial Cystis, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Fifth Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Lupus, EARLY ALS, early Alzheimers Disease, Crohn's Disease, Menieres Syn., Reynaud's Syn., Sjogren's Syn., IBS, Colitis, Prostatitis, Psych Disorders ( bipolar, dep., etc. ), Encephalitis, Sleep Disorders, Thyroid Disease, and various other illnesses, see OTHER DISEASES AND LYME.... RELATIONSHIP. The one common thread with lyme Disease is the number of systems affected ( Brain, CNS, Autonomic Nervous System, Cardiovascular, Digestive, Respiratory, Musco-Skeltal, etc. ) and sometimes the hourly/daily/weekly/monthly changing of symptoms. THE DIAGNOSIS, WITH TODAY'S LIMITATION IN THE LAB, MUST BE CLINICAL. end-----I REPEAT-----MUST BE CLINICAL.
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Old 01-11-2010, 01:01 PM
can can is offline
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Yes, somtimes my symptoms would change hourly, daily, weekly and monthly. Case in point ( one of many )--- about 15 months ago I did not even have the strength to walk out the front door but about 7 months later, I drove around 700 miles round trip to pick up my Mom. So, again after doing such limited research, the most important factor with lyme disease, is to go to a DOCTOR WHO IS VERY, VERY, VERY, WELL EXPERIENCED AND KNOWLEDGEABLE IN LYME DISEASE. I think there are at least 3 co-infection types and if standard ( of which there are many many ) treatment does not work, then it could be a piroplasm. Also, these Lyme Disease critters are very smart and can hide, dodge, and change!!!
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Old 01-11-2010, 05:34 PM
Zonulin Zonulin is offline
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Good points, Can! Do you get Dr. Mercola's free newsletters? Check this out: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/ar...e-Disease.aspx which has this:

Quote:
According to CDC statistics, reported cases of Lyme disease rose by nearly 38 percent between 2007 and 2008.

Some are now questioning whether Lyme disease might in fact be a silent epidemic.

Millions of people who are diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer's, chronic fatigue syndrome and other degenerative diseases could actually have Lyme disease causing or contributing to their condition.

Traditional Signs and Symptoms

Traditionally, signs and symptoms of Lyme disease include:

•A skin rash, often resembling a bulls-eye
•Fever
•Headache
•Muscle pain
•Stiff neck
•Swelling of your knees and other large joints

However, as discussed by Dr. Klinghardt above, there are numerous other symptoms not traditionally considered as signs of Lyme disease; everything from sciatica to chronic TMJ problems, adrenal fatigue, GERD, and other seemingly unrelated symptoms.

Unfortunately, many still believe Lyme disease is tick-borne only, which as it turns out, is incorrect. It can also be transmitted by other insects, including fleas, mosquitoes and mites -- and by human-to-human contact. So whether or not you’ve ever been bitten by a tick might not matter.

The Elusive Nature of Lyme Disease
Lyme can disseminate through your body with remarkable speed. In its classic spirochete form, the bacteria can contract like a spring and twist to propel itself forward. It can travel through your blood vessel walls as well as your connective tissue. (Because of its spring-like movement, it can actually swim better in tissue than in blood.)

Studies have shown that less than a week after being infected, the Lyme spirochete can be deeply embedded inside your tendons, muscle, heart, and brain.

It invades tissue, replicates, and then destroys its host cell as it emerges.

Sometimes the cell wall can collapse around the bacterium, forming a cloaking device that allows it to evade detection by many tests and by your body's immune system.

Why Drugs Don’t Work for This Mystery Illness
Adding further complexity, the Lyme spirochete (Bb) is pleomorphic, meaning it can radically change form, from spirochete to round cell wall deficient (CWD) forms, and back again!

This is partly why the conventional antibiotic treatments rarely work.

The problem is that a CWD organism does not have a fixed exterior membrane presenting information -- a target -- that would allow your immune system or drugs to attack it. This feature also effectively deters detection through many medical tests.

Additionally, because Bb is pleomorphic, you can't expect any one antibiotic to be effective. Bacteria share genetic material with one another, so the offspring of the next bug can have a new genetic sequence that can resist the antibiotic just given.

Lyme disease is notoriously difficult to diagnose and frequently even harder to treat. But as Dr. Klinghardt mentioned, drugs are rarely the way to go.

Another case in point: in 1999, SmithKline Beecham was sued over their Lyme disease vaccine as it turned out to cause an incurable form of autoimmune arthritis, and in many cases produced symptoms worse than those of the illness. SmithKline stopped producing the vaccine three years later, citing “insufficient consumer demand.”
Karen
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Old 01-11-2010, 11:52 PM
can can is offline
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AND EVERYONE THINKS YOU CAN ONLY GET IT FROM A TICK BITE, HA! Such great information! Karen, thank you. That also lead me to read about Dietrich Klinghardt MD, PhD
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Old 01-13-2010, 03:25 AM
Zonulin Zonulin is offline
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Can - check out this site: http://betterhealthguy.com/joomla/index.php

Karen
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Old 01-17-2010, 04:04 AM
Razzle0 Razzle0 is offline
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Absolutely something to look into if a GF diet doesn't work or doesn't help enough. I had a lot of symptoms that I was hoping would go away on a GF diet (EnteroLab diagnosis of Gluten Sensitivity in July 2005). A few symptoms got less intense or disappeared, but I was still very ill. Two years later (Fall 2007), I was diagnosed with Lyme after all this time of getting sicker and sicker with no answers and nothing helping enough to bother (been sick since 1978).

Lyme is very sneaky - it hides in cell wall deficient forms, and also can hide in a cystic form or in biofilms. It changes outer surface proteins constantly, making it extremely difficult for the immune system to create antibodies that actually work against the bug. The tests are only about 50-60% accurate, meaning a negative result cannot rule out Lyme. So there is no way to know for sure the disease is gone.

Coinfections include Babesia (parasite similar to Malaria), Bartonella (another bacteria that is very difficult to kill), Anaplasma/Ehrlichia (bacteria that acts like a white blood cell parasite), Mycoplasma (another class of bacteria that are difficult to kill), Rickettsia (another spirochete bacteria), Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and various other viruses & bacteria.

Going after the Lyme bacteria can sometimes cause a lot of problems (herxheimer reaction, or "die-off"), too, which can be difficult to determine whether symptoms are from an allergic/intolerance to the treatment, a die-off reaction, or a flare of the actual Lyme/coinfections.

I started an herbal protocol to treat the Lyme and a few weeks into it my GI tract shut itself down and I was unable to eat or drink anything. This happened in 2008. It took a whole year just to be able to swallow solids again; I'm still having trouble swallowing liquids and am in the process of weaning off of TPN (complete nutrition given through a vein in the arm). So Lyme treatment is nothing to fool around with under the care of anyone but a knowledgeable and experienced physician.

-Razzle
Gluten Sensitivity (EnteroLab dx 7/05; GF since then)
Chronic Lyme (dx clinically 2007, first CDC-positive test 2008), Bartonella (dx clinically 2008), suspected Anaplasma/Ehrlichia (tests pending)
My Lyme doctor and I believe that the Lyme caused my body to develop Gluten Sensitivity (and many other allergies/sensitivities), as well as many other health problems that were misdiagnosed as Crohn's Disease, UCTD/Lupus, Osteoarthritis, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, etc.
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