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  #1  
Old 12-18-2009, 05:43 PM
bewolf bewolf is offline
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Default Farmer with celiac

Hi all.

A friend of mine has just recently been diagnosed with celiac, he has it bad already affecting bones etc.

I have tried to reassure him that with diet etc it can be dealt with and of course I will direct him to this site.

But a question that he wants to know is - He is a beef farmer and uses wheat straw for bedding food etc and he wonders if touching and breathing in the dust is going to affect him, as this is his living he is understandibly worried.

So, I said I would ask the experts here what they thought.

Personally I am worried too.

TIA

Wolfie.
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Old 12-18-2009, 06:05 PM
tommytutor tommytutor is offline
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Smile Celiac answer for your friend.

I was diagnosed 4 years ago. More than your friend has had it all his life. Most do. Tell him not to eat anything with wheat, rye, oats or barley. Not cross contamination. This limits a lot of eating out. It is what you eat that will affect him. If he doesn't take care there can be all kinds of complications. There are all kinds of gluten free webs sites that he can order some really good pasta and other gf foods. Expensive, but worth it. I threw away a lot at first, but I've got it down now. I have to go in every six months to make sure I am obsorbing my nutrients. Also my liver has been affected. My bones are also thinning. It takes a lot of discipline and understanding from family and friends.
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  #3  
Old 12-18-2009, 07:20 PM
jcc jcc is offline
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Quote:
He is a beef farmer and uses wheat straw for bedding food etc and he wonders if touching and breathing in the dust is going to affect him, as this is his living he is understandibly worried.
Yes, I think this could present a big problem for him. I think he needs to talk to his doctor about it....although frankly, most of them are more clueness than any of us.

I was warned about even taking my child on a hay ride... to be sure it wasn't in a wagon with wheat straw.

I know of someone who had trouble from handling bird seed... because there was wheat among it.

I don't know what to suggest... I'm not sure if wearing protective gear would be an option... like face mask and gloves, and then showering after. Is there someone else on the farm that could take care of those chores that involve handling wheat straw? I'm sure neither of these two ideas sound very practical and even then he will need to be closely monitored. He won't improve if he is continuously being exposed to wheat.

He's asking a very good question. I'm going to ask a few others about this.
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Old 12-18-2009, 09:10 PM
annelb annelb is offline
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I am the person who had difficulty from the dust in the bird seed. I would think handling wheat straw could cause similar problems. The straw part is ok, it is any seed heads that would be the problem. I would imagine the bales of wheat straw have broken wheat seeds and there is probably dust from them. If you are breathing in the dust, then some is being swallowed too.

I agree with Cara. It would be great if someone else could handle the straw and close monitoring by his doctor to be sure his antibodies are falling and the villi are healing.

Bakers have had to change jobs because of wheat flour floating in the air.

Anne
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  #5  
Old 12-19-2009, 01:49 AM
GFPaperdoll GFPaperdoll is offline
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Default Wheat Dust

I would imagine that it is going to be a problem. If there is no one else that can do that chore. He would definitely need to wear a good mask over his mouth & nose. I would also suggest protective goggles to keep the dust out of his eyes. maybe he can do something to lessen his exposure to the dust like not be in a confined space with the dust, not stand downwind, not throw the hay, etc.

One thing that he might not be aware of is that he does not want to wear those clothes inside the house. Plus it will be in his hair. He would need a shower outside or in the barn or somewhere. Because once he walks thru the house with those "hay exposed" clothes, that dust then gets on everything. So instead of getting just one exposure a day he will get it all the time & not have a safe place to retreat to.

When he washes his "hay exposed" clothes he does not want to wash them with other laundry.

for osteoporosis he should make sure he is taking plenty of vitamin D & that he gets weight bearing exercise, & consults a good osteo doctor.
jeanne
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Old 12-19-2009, 06:04 AM
pab pab is offline
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to be blunt, he needs to change his bedding.....dont know what else is available to him, but it needs to change. A fine mist of water will keep the dust down in the mean time....but this will only be an option if the outdoor temp is warm enough. i think he is in for a lot of trouble....good luck
ah wolfie, just noticed you are in england, how about oat straw?
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Old 12-19-2009, 09:01 AM
Ted Hutchinson Ted Hutchinson is offline
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Bone metabolism in celiac disease.[ The calcium and the 25(OH)vitamin D3 levels were lower in children with CD than in control subjects, and the PTH level was higher in children with CD than in control subjects

One of the reasons this condition arises is the body is short of anti inflammatory agents. Vitamin D3 being the main one but omega 3 and magnesium are not far behind. Cutting out omega 6 to no more than 4% of calories also improves inflammatory status.

1 x 10,000iu/daily vitamin D3 $5 discount code WAB666 will help restore status to 60ng/ml Celiacs need to keep a higher vitamin D status than people who do not have inflammatory conditions. While 5000iu/daily should be sufficient for non celiacs those with this condition need double.

25(OH)D testing after 8~12 weeks to check that the 10,000iu has done the trick. But if his D3 reserve tank is empty it may take until this time next year to correct.

There is absolutely no danger in taking 10,000iu/daily vitamin D3 Unless he goes to the Canaries or other subtropical location he wont be getting any UVB from sunlight in the UK until next March and even then while he's sitting in his tractor cab/land rover/car it will be Vitamin D3 depleting UVA he gets.

I hope he is aware that in the same way it takes time to become vitamin D replete and restore immune function, it also takes time to heal.
So total elimination of all gluten sources for at least six months is required to allow time for healing.
However avoiding them for life isn't a problem. We evolved for hundreds of thousands of years before the invention of farming and our DNA functions better if grains aren't part of our diet anyway.

I don't understand why people with this condition don't reduce the risk of inadvertently eating gluten by simply eating a low carb diet like Atkins. It's easier to skip the pasta altogether than pay through the nose for gluten free alternatives. Easy to stir fry some riced (zapped in the processor for 2 mins) cauliflower and use that instead as a base for your ragu sauce.
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  #8  
Old 12-19-2009, 10:29 PM
bewolf bewolf is offline
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Hi all,

Thanks for the replies.

As you can imagine my friends are on quite a STEEP learning curve as they are trying to gather information together.

They have taken on board the suggestions you have made about the straw and are trying to think of ways to deal with the problem.

All suggestions are helpful.

I will try to keep you up todate on how they are getting on.

Wolfie.
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NIL ILLEGITIMUS CARBORUNDUM.

When they say, "But you look fine", you say --
"And you look intelligent. Go figure."
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  #9  
Old 12-20-2009, 10:41 PM
tommytutor tommytutor is offline
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Smile

Anytime I have heard of anyone reacting to wheat for celiac, I might be wrong, is only when they eat wheat. It has everything to do with the small intestine. I had 10" of mine small intestine removed. There are wheat allergies, but it has nothing to do with celiac. Ask the doctor. When you touch wheat or inhale it, it is not going through the digestive system. I can touch wheat, barley, rye and oats and have no reaction but as soon as I eat something with gluten in it, I get very sick. There should be no cross contamination. Mean don't let any gluten free foods you eat be cooked in the same pan for example. Your friend is the only onr that is going to know if he is going to have a reaction to hay because he won't be able to stay out of the bathroom. Celiac is an ammune disorder. It is very serious. It is a digestive problem. What else can I say. I have known people that just assume that have Celiac and go on a diet for it. I had a biopsy. There are blood test too, but what I understand they are not as conclusive. Check the Mayo Web Site out. It can explain a lot to you.
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  #10  
Old 12-20-2009, 11:16 PM
Zonulin Zonulin is offline
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That's a good point - and we all have varying degrees of sensitivity to wheat. I know a woman who cannot tolerate any soaps, makeup, hair products which contain wheat - she immediately reacts with big ugly welts. And she can't tolerate even a crumb of something with gluten in it - she has diarrhea for DAYS. Yet she's not been diagnosed with "celiac" and she's never had "flattened villi upon endoscopy," the OFFICIAL SEAL OF APPROVAL from the medical community. So your friend may be able to pitch wheat with no ill effects, or he may continue to be sick due to this environmental contact (as opposed to ingesting it). We are all very different in our biological reactions to gluten. Big help, eh? I wonder if any IgA or IgG reactions to gluten or gliadin have been done on this gentleman.

Karen
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